Video: Blogging Through Cancer

When Tara Shuman was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2012, blogging was not the first thing that came to mind.

“I put together an email to my friends and family to tell them about my diagnosis, and I realized when writing the email that it was very therapeutic,” Shuman says.

The next night, when she was having trouble sleeping, Shuman searched the Internet for “how to start a blog.” Within a few hours, www.tarabeatscancer.com was born.

Throughout her treatment, Shuman has used the blog to cope with her cancer experience. In a recent live web chat, Shuman talked about how her blog has been a part of her cancer journey.

Shuman recommends blogging for anyone facing cancer or a difficult time in life. The key, she says, is to be vulnerable and not worry about what people may think.

“Your story is your story, and you can tell it in any way that makes you feel good,” Shuman says.

To hear more about Shuman’s blogging experience, view the video below:

 

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One thought on “Video: Blogging Through Cancer

  1. I started a pdf blog for my family and friends when I got diagnosed with fNHL last spring. I didn’t want to put it out for strangers, but I wanted and needed to tell those I love how I’m doing both physically and mentally. (I titled it “The Adventures of Yertle the Turtle—My Cancer Adventure” before I found out that I was on “watch and wait” and that if my cancer turns aggressive the chemo recommended will not make me lose my hair, but I’ve kept the name ’cause I like it.) Since then, I also was diagnosed with a pheochromocytoma (which was removed this summer) so it’s been useful for educating everyone about those as well. And, it has really helped me mentally—better than a journal just for myself!

  2. I started a pdf blog for my family and friends when I got diagnosed with fNHL last spring. I didn’t want to put it out for strangers, but I wanted and needed to tell those I love how I’m doing both physically and mentally. (I titled it “The Adventures of Yertle the Turtle—My Cancer Adventure” before I found out that I was on “watch and wait” and that if my cancer turns aggressive the chemo recommended will not make me lose my hair, but I’ve kept the name ’cause I like it.) Since then, I also was diagnosed with a pheochromocytoma (which was removed this summer) so it’s been useful for educating everyone about those as well. And, it has really helped me mentally—better than a journal just for myself!

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