Should I Take Vitamins and Supplements During Cancer Treatment?

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Getting the nutrients your body needs isn’t always easy, especially when certain treatments, such as chemotherapy, may make food less desirable. Many people consider taking vitamins and supplements to ensure optimal health, but, according to Dana-Farber nutritionist Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, it is important to think about the benefits of “food first.”

Eating a plant-based diet can also increase your intake of health-promoting nutrients, such as phytonutrients, which are associated with foods such as blueberries, carrots, tomatoes, and other colorful fruits and vegetables. Many of these phytonutrients come in pill form, but the way your body processes supplements may be different from the way it would process natural foods. Some high-dose antioxidant pills can even reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatment, so it is important to discuss vitamins and supplements with your physician or dietitian.

KRR_IMG_0878_13-2While some supplements may be necessary, for example, if you have a magnesium or vitamin D deficiency, it is easier than you may think to get vitamins and nutrients through food. Some recipes that can help boost your intake of phytonutrients include:

Watch other videos from the Eating Well During Cancer series, and learn more about our nutrition services and how you can eat well during cancer treatment. Download our Ask the Nutritionist: Recipes for Fighting Cancer app for iPhone or Android for more delicious and nutritious recipes.

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One thought on “Should I Take Vitamins and Supplements During Cancer Treatment?

  1. For my first infusion,I brought a full lunch from DF cafeteria and ate during the entire three hours. I did it because the appt time would have left me famished if I had waited. Also I was not devastated by my diagnosis and suffered no anxiety or feelings that might have curtailed my interest in eating. Later during each of my I day a week, 12 weeks of chemo got fresh soups from BW cafe with a great piece of fresh bread and always an Odwalla green supersmoothie . I never had any nausea and only slight fatigue….so I have wondered if eating at the very time of the infusion might keep nausea at bay at the. Ery start of chemo?

  2. For my first infusion,I brought a full lunch from DF cafeteria and ate during the entire three hours. I did it because the appt time would have left me famished if I had waited. Also I was not devastated by my diagnosis and suffered no anxiety or feelings that might have curtailed my interest in eating. Later during each of my I day a week, 12 weeks of chemo got fresh soups from BW cafe with a great piece of fresh bread and always an Odwalla green supersmoothie . I never had any nausea and only slight fatigue….so I have wondered if eating at the very time of the infusion might keep nausea at bay at the. Ery start of chemo?

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