Cancer Mythbusters Episode #5: Cancer Clinical Trials

0

Clinical trials are scientific studies in which new treatments – drugs, diagnostic procedures, and other therapies – are tested to determine if they are safe and effective for patients. Nearly all cancer drugs in use today were tested and made available to patients through clinical trials, making them a crucial component of cancer research.

But what does it mean for a patient to enroll in a clinical trial? In this episode of Cancer Mythbusters, we break down common myths and questions about how these trials work with the help of Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, PhD, director of the Early Drug Development Center at Dana-Farber. 

Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, PhD

Hear the discussion by listening to the podcast episode below, or click “download” to listen later. Subscribe options are also available via iTunes, Google Play, the Stitcher appTuneIn app, and RSS.

In the Cancer Mythbusters podcast series, we dive into the many myths and misconceptions in the world of cancer. Every episode, we look at a myth and debunk it with the help of our world-leading clinicians and researchers. Visit Dana-Farber’s podcast page for more information on other cancer podcast series.

 

Make An Appointment

For adults: 877-960-1562

Quick access: Appointments as soon as the next day for new adult patients

For children: 888-733-4662

All content in these blogs is provided by independent writers and does not represent the opinions or advice of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute or its partners.

Latest Tweets

Dana-Farber @danafarber
WATCH LIVE: Sarah Nikifrow, MD, PhD, discusses FDA approval of drug to treat adults with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: https://t.co/t1m14izqBK
Dana-Farber @danafarber
RT @KristyNBCBoston: Tonite @nbcboston news at 5, I speak w/Dr. Jacobson @DanaFarber. Car T-cell therapy gives hope to those who've run out…

Republish our posts on your blog

Interested in sharing one of our stories on your blog? Feel free to republish this content! We just ask that you credit Dana-Farber, link to the original article, and refrain from making edits that change the original context. Questions? Email the editors at insight_blog@dfci.harvard.edu.