Pediatric Leukemia: Signs and Symptoms

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Pediatric leukemia is cancer of the blood and develops in the bone marrow. The bone marrow is the soft, spongy center of the long bones that produces the three major blood cells: white blood cells to fight infection; red blood cells that carry oxygen; and platelets that help the blood clot and stop bleeding. When a child has leukemia, the bone marrow, for an unknown reason, begins to make white blood cells that do not mature correctly, but continuously reproduce. Normal, healthy cells only reproduce when there is enough space for them to fit.

The body can regulate the production of cells by sending signals when to stop. With leukemia, these cells do not respond to the signals to stop reproducing, regardless of space available. These abnormal cells reproduce very quickly and do not function as healthy white blood cells to help fight infection. When the immature white blood cells, called blasts, begin to crowd out other healthy cells in the bone marrow, the child experiences the symptoms of childhood leukemia.

Learn more about treatment for pediatric leukemia at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center.

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For adults: 877-960-1562

Quick access: Appointments as soon as the next day for new adult patients

For children: 888-733-4662

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