Patient Stories, Adult , Psychosocial Oncology , Sarcoma
Becoming a Mom with the Help of a Friend – Despite Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma

Deciding to have a baby can be a happy – and sometimes scary – time for parents. Worries and questions about finances, the future, and the baby’s health are common. But most parents-to-be don’t have a cancer diagnosis looming over their heads like Abby and Tom Morgan did. A 32-year-old teacher, […]

August 22, 2017
0
Osteosarcoma , Patient Stories, Adult
How This Osteosarcoma Patient Deals with the Ups and Downs of the Cancer Journey

By Lyndsay McCaffery Two months. That’s how long I knew I had cancer before it was gone. I was a patient, and then a survivor, all before I had time to process what was happening to me. It has been almost five years and I am still trying to wrap […]

August 11, 2017
0
Sarcoma , Soft Tissue Sarcoma
Signs and Symptoms of Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Soft tissue sarcoma refers to cancer that begins in the muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue of the body. View the slideshow below to learn more about signs and symptoms of this cancer, as well as risk factors.   Learn more from the Center for Sarcoma […]

July 7, 2017
0
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult , Sarcoma
Rare Sarcoma Patient Finds New Purpose in Helping Others

By Mary Anne Oldford I was born to survive. Before I was born, I almost lost my life when my mother had a fibroid tumor surgically removed while I was still in the womb. Later, as a 5-year-old, I was diagnosed with polio, paralyzed, and told I would never walk again. […]

February 28, 2017
1
Care for children , Ewing sarcoma
What Is Ewing Sarcoma?

Ewing sarcoma is a cancer that grows in the bones and soft tissues, usually in the thigh or pelvis. It is most common in children and young adults between the ages of 5 and 20, and more common in boys than girls. Although most patients are teenagers, Ewing sarcoma can […]

August 31, 2016
0
Care for adults , Care for children , Patient Stories, Adult , Sarcoma
Sarcoma Patient Sets Sights on Nursing Career

Twenty-year-old Amanda Lee has always wanted to be a nurse. But after a life-changing diagnosis in 2012, Lee suddenly had a more personal motivation to pursue her career goals. After seeing her primary care doctor for pain in her lower back, doctors determined Lee had a tumor that was causing […]

December 24, 2015
0
Care for adults , Sarcoma
What is Liposarcoma?

Cancers known as sarcomas develop in the connective tissues, such as muscle, fat, and bone, that hold the body together. The type of sarcoma diagnosed in Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, liposarcoma, originates in fat cells that have been driven by random DNA errors into malignant growth, forming tumors. George Demetri, […]

September 19, 2014
0
Cancer Genetics , Cancer research , Care for children
Genetic counseling now recommended for children with sarcoma

If your son or daughter has been diagnosed with a type of sarcoma – a tumor in connective tissue like muscles or bones – there are many questions: Will my child make a full recovery? What are the immediate and long-term side effects of treatment? Most parents don’t consider whether […]

January 26, 2012
5
CAR T-cell therapy , Patient Stories, Adult , Research
CAR T-Cell Therapy Gives Cancer Patients New Hope

Judy Wilkins tried four different chemotherapy regiments over 18 grueling months to try to put her lymphoma into remission. Her team never could. But thanks to CAR T-cell therapy, an emerging immunotherapy treatment that is showing great promise in clinical trials nationwide, Wilkins is cancer-free. CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor) T-cell therapy […]

September 19, 2017
1
Cancer research , Immunotherapy
What’s New in Treatment of Adult Histiocytic Disorders?

While blood cancers known as adult histiocytic disorders are very rare and many patients do well with today’s treatments, researchers are working to improve outcomes with therapies targeted to newly discovered mutations – and they are about to begin testing immunotherapies, too. Histiocytic disorders involved overproduction of immune white cells, […]

June 29, 2017
0
Cancer research , CAR T-cell therapy , Immunotherapy , Research
Catch Me if You Can: Finding Cancer Cells that Hide in Plain Sight

In the high-stakes contest of hide-and-seek between cancer cells and the human immune system, the advantage doesn’t always lie with the body’s defenders. A new approach to treatment, known as CAR T-cell therapy, may shift that balance of power. Cancer cells conceal themselves from the immune system not by barricading […]

June 21, 2017
0
Blood disorders, childhood , Cancer research , Patient Stories, Pediatric
How Pediatric and Canine Cancer Similarities Can Help Both Children and Pets

In March 2016, Ollie the pug, a therapy dog at Boston Children’s Hospital, paid a bedside visit to 7-year-old Carter Mock. Both dog and boy lost limbs to osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. Ollie’s left front leg was amputated at the shoulder. After removing the tumor in Carter’s left […]

May 2, 2017
0
Cancer research , Risk and Prevention , Treatments and Procedures
How Does Radiation Raise the Risk of Other Cancers?

Along with chemotherapy, radiation therapy is a common method for treating cancer; about half of patients receive the therapy, which uses high-energy radiation to shrink tumors and kill cancer cells, during the course of their treatment. While radiation therapy is effective against cancer cells, it also leaves its mark on […]

April 14, 2017
0
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult , Survivorship
Meeting Two Challenges: Tips for Dealing with a Cancer-Related Amputation

Felipe Estrela thought things couldn’t get tougher when he was diagnosed with a rare soft tissue cancer called biphasic synovial sarcoma in 2014. Then, shortly after having a tumor the size of a small football removed from his right leg, the 29-year-old faced a new challenge:  an above-the-knee amputation. A […]

February 22, 2017
0
Cancer research , Immunotherapy , Precision Cancer Medicine , Research , Risk and Prevention
Experts Forecast Cancer Research and Treatment Advances in 2017

This post originally appeared on Cancer Research Catalyst, the official blog of the American Association for Cancer Research. It was originally published Jan. 10, 2017. By Srivani Ravoori, PhD As we step into 2017, a big question looming in the minds of all stakeholders in the cancer research arena is: […]

January 10, 2017
0
Coping with Cancer , General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
For Cancer Survivors, a New Look at New Year’s Resolutions

Olivia Bowie says she’s never been one to make New Year’s resolutions. Since she couldn’t keep commitments like eating healthier or working out more, she didn’t bother making them, the college student jokes. Then, in 2015, doctors discovered she had rhabdomyosarcoma. “Being diagnosed with cancer, and going through treatment, has changed […]

January 5, 2017
1
Care for adults , Palliative Care, childhood
Oncology and Palliative Care Team Up to Benefit Patients

A cancer care team often involves quite a few players: oncologists, nurses, radiation oncologists, social workers, psychiatrists, and others. While these experts often improve patient outcomes, such a large multidisciplinary team can sometimes make communication and coordination difficult. Dana-Farber’s Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care department is working to change that. […]

December 12, 2016
0
Cervical Cancer , General interest , Risk and Prevention
What Are AIDS-Related Cancers?

People infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS are more susceptible to certain types of cancer than people who are not infected. In fact, some types of cancers are so common in people with HIV that they are referred to as AIDS-related or AIDS-defining cancers – including Kaposi’s sarcoma, […]

December 1, 2016
0
General interest , Research , Risk and Prevention
Is Cancer Contagious?

While some may wonder, cancer is not contagious; a healthy person cannot catch cancer from a person who has the disease, nor can it be spread by close contact with a cancer patient. Cancer cells are far different from infectious agents such as bacteria and viruses. A cancer cell is […]

November 9, 2016
1
General interest , Treatments and Procedures
What Is Combination Therapy?

Combination therapy, the use of more than one type of therapy in treating a patient, is a hallmark of cancer treatment. The complexity of the disease – its tendency to spread beyond its original site and become resistant to certain drugs, and its genetic diversity – underscores the need for […]

November 7, 2016
0
Care for children , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Post-Cancer, Post-Rotationplasty, Teen Athlete Continues to Excel

The ball leaps off the metal bat with an unmistakable “ping” that denotes good contact. Miles Goldberg runs to first base, from which the 13-year-old will soon contemplate – and safely execute – a steal of second. Miles is used to transitioning naturally with the seasons from football to hockey […]

October 19, 2016
1
Cancer research , Immunotherapy , Research
What’s New in Cancer Immunotherapy?

Keeping up with progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy requires paying close attention. The number of approved drugs that help the body’s immune system fight cancer continues to grow, as does the list of different cancers in which immunotherapy is proving effective – in some cases yielding dramatically longer-lasting […]

September 27, 2016
0
Care for adults , Histiocytosis
What Are Adult Histiocyte Disorders?

Adult histiocyte disorders are a group of rare diseases that involve an over-production of white blood cells known as histiocytes, which destroy foreign substances and protect the body from infection. In adults, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is the most common of these diseases. LCH arises when specialized histiocytes called dendritic […]

September 26, 2016
0
Care for children , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Carter Climbs to New Heights – with a Prosthetic Leg

  More than 50 feet above ground, a wire rope extends from one tree to another. High in the trees, seven-year-old Carter Mock fearlessly steps off a platform and places first one foot, then the other, onto the wire. Holding tight to hanging ropes for balance, he navigates across the […]

September 15, 2016
0
Care for children , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Cancer or No Cancer – Carlie Will Sing

Her voice at first sings softly, then gradually gains intensity and rises to a crescendo as she belts out the refrain of a tune she and her dad co-wrote: “You’re not standing alone!” 15-year-old Carlie Gonzalez has been singing and making music for as long as she can remember. But […]

September 1, 2016
0
Care for adults , Risk and Prevention
Why Does Cancer Risk Increase As We Get Older?

Age is the biggest single risk factor for cancer. Risk increases significantly after age 50, and half of all cancers occur at age 66 and above. According to the National Cancer Institute, one quarter of new cancer diagnoses are in people aged 65 to 74. The median age of diagnosis […]

June 23, 2016
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Osteosarcoma , Patient Stories, Adult
Chemo or no Chemo, Every Cancer Patient Deserves Support

By Lyndsay McCaffery When you find out you have cancer, your mind goes to a million different places. You have an endless amount of questions, an overwhelming sense of panic, and life as you know it is changed forever. I was diagnosed with parosteal osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, […]

June 3, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
A Behind the Scenes Look at the People Helping to Usher in New Cancer Therapies: A Nurse’s Story

This post originally appeared on HuffPost Impact. By Joan Lucca, RN, MSN Nearly four decades ago, I became a nurse and dedicated my life’s work to the care and comfort of patients. The ‘70s was a decade of change and opportunity as doors began to open for women in emerging […]

May 17, 2016
0
Care for adults , Care for children
Nurses Value Strong Bond with Patients and Colleagues

They arrived at their profession – and to Dana-Farber – on different paths, but nurses Jade Callender, RN, BSN; Jane Goldie, RN; Kaitlen Reyes, DNP, FNP; and Courtney Shea, RN, BSN, share a passion for oncology nursing. In honor of National Nurses Week May 6-12, the four share what they […]

May 6, 2016
2
Cancer research , Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult , Precision Cancer Medicine
How Precision Cancer Care Saved a Life

Ronaldo de Oliveira was close to death. The 33-year-old father of two young children had been diagnosed with myeloid sarcoma, a rare form of leukemia that worsened despite treatment with six different chemotherapy regimens. His wife pleaded with his oncologist, Richard Stone, MD, director of the Adult Leukemia Program at […]

March 18, 2016
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Tips for Starting College During Cancer Treatment

By Stephen Perez Cancer has a way of putting your life on hold and making you prioritize your health, treatments, and your best attempts to not feel sick through the process. While there’s never a good time for this interruption, my diagnosis came at a particularly difficult time: the second […]

January 11, 2016
1
Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Empowering a Patient: Parenting a Young Adult with Cancer

By Steve Pierce I recently read the Insight blog post, From Pediatric to Young Adult Patient: The Importance of Advocating for Yourself, and I found it very enlightening.  As I read about Jeremy’s experience dealing with cancer as a young adult, it occurred to me that his point of view has a […]

November 19, 2015
0
Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult , Survivorship
Realizing Cancer Isn’t Free When You’re Cancer Free

By Samantha Watson I went through cancer treatment twice in my early 20s, diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma in December 1999 and secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemia) in April 2001. I had to leave college to go through chemo, surgeries and eventually a bone marrow transplant, and I sat in a hospital […]

October 16, 2015
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Patient Stories, Adult
Five Tips for Facing a Rare Cancer

By Becky Sail At age 22, I was diagnosed with a rare sarcoma called aggressive angiomyxoma – say that 10 times fast. When my parents and I got the news we asked the doctor, “Is it cancer?” He responded, “That is a complicated question.” He said he had never seen […]

August 24, 2015
12
Cancer research , Care for children , Leukemias, childhood
Progress in the Treatment of Childhood Leukemia

Although treatments for childhood cancer patients are improving, cancer remains the leading cause of death by disease in children. Doctors and researchers are also focused on decreasing the toxicity of these treatments, which can have side effects years after a child finishes treatment. “The war against childhood cancer is hardly […]

August 13, 2015
1
Cancer research
Solving Puzzles with Cigall Kadoch

Growing up in the San Francisco area, Cigall Kadoch, PhD, had a passion for puzzles. The daughter of a Moroccan-born, Israeli-raised father and a mother from Michigan who together developed an interior design business, Kadoch excelled in school and pretty much everything else. Above all, she loved to solve brain-teasers. […]

July 23, 2015
1
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult , Uncategorized
Young Adults Share Their Cancer Journeys Through Photos

When Jenn Jackson, a trained physician, was diagnosed with leiomyosarcoma in 2011 and found out she could no longer practice medicine, the news was devastating. “Getting this cancer diagnosis changed the whole trajectory of my life,” says Jackson, who was diagnosed at 35, after completing 10 years of medical training. […]

July 17, 2015
1
General interest , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Young Patients’ Artwork Shows Creativity and Courage

The artist Henri Matisse once said, “creativity takes courage.” So does facing cancer as a child. Cancer, creativity and courage merged at a recent exhibit of art by patients of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. The artwork was created during the FACES (Feeling Accepted, Confident, Empowered and Strong) […]

May 14, 2015
2
Precision Cancer Medicine , Uncategorized
Five Things You Should Know About Precision Medicine

When President Barack Obama rolled out his Precision Medicine Initiative, it included an increased funding request of $215 million in the 2016 federal budget. Precision medicine is changing the way cancer is studied and treated. Here are five important things to know about it. 1. Precision medicine can improve diagnosis […]

February 20, 2015
0
Breast cancer , Care for adults , Fertility Preservation
Fertility After Breast Cancer

Young women may think about having children, but when diagnosed with breast cancer, patients often face these decisions long before they thought they would have to. For Maggie Loucks, NP-C, who was diagnosed at age 28, preserving fertility became a major factor in deciding what treatment plan to pursue. “You’re 28-years […]

December 22, 2014
3
Cancer research , Treatments and Procedures
Research Shines Spotlight on Risk of Morcellation Procedure in Hysterectomy

Research by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists supports the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s recent warning about laparoscopic power morcellation, a procedure sometimes used to remove the uterus and uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths that often appear during childbearing years. The FDA based its warning on data suggesting that the procedure may […]

July 31, 2014
2
General interest , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Young Adult Artist and Athlete Determined to Win the Fight Against Cancer

The below interview with patient Fernando Morales was featured in the 2014 Spring/Summer issue of Dana-Farber’s Paths of Progress, now available as a free app for iPad.  My cancer diagnosis came right smack in the middle of high school. I was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma in March 2011, my sophomore year. I […]

June 20, 2014
0
Cancer Genetics , Patient Stories, Adult , Uncategorized
Putting the Puzzle Pieces Together

By Jenn Perry When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at 36, it was like déjà vu for my family. My mother had been diagnosed with the same disease at the same age, while pregnant with her third child. I learned I had breast cancer just six months after giving […]

June 16, 2014
0
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
How One Teacher Shared a Cancer Diagnosis with Her Students

By Abby Morgan May 2013 was an exciting time for my husband and me.  We were in the process of buying our first house and thinking about starting a family. But, when a visit to the doctor to investigate pain in my right knee revealed a large mass, our excitement […]

June 11, 2014
2
Care for children
More Children are Developing Cancer, But Fewer are Dying from It

By Tom Ulrich Last month, the American Cancer Society (ACS) released “Cancer Statistics, 2014,” their annual estimate of new cancers diagnoses and deaths for the year ahead. The report was heavily focused on adult malignancies—not surprisingly, given that the number of adult cancer patients in the nation is orders of magnitudes greater […]

February 6, 2014
0
Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Cancer Diagnosis Leads to Nursing Career

By Maggie Loucks, NP-C When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 28, during my last semester of graduate school, I remember thinking that this had to mean something. I needed to turn an unfortunate situation into something positive, so I decided to pursue oncology nursing where I felt I […]

December 2, 2013
0
Care for children , Coping with Cancer , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Teen Patient Uses Images to Document Cancer Treatment

By  Saul Wisnia Rayquan “Ray” Fregeau’s smile lights up a room, even after five days of chemotherapy. His upbeat personality infuses his poetry, but until recently the 17-year-old patient at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center had trouble putting into words what he’s gone through since his February cancer diagnosis, […]

August 26, 2013
0
Cancer research , Treatments and Procedures
Turning Traditional Medicine Into Cancer Drugs

Quite a few substances used in traditional medicine in China or other countries have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as cancer drugs… and their numbers are growing.  Some examples are: Arsenic trioxide, made from arsenic sulfide ore, has been used therapeutically for more than 2,400 years. Following promising […]

April 23, 2013
1
Care for children , General interest , Jimmy Fund Clinic
The Red Sox and the Jimmy Fund: A Winning Team for 60 Years

by Saul Wisnia Like many New Englanders, Fernando Morales can’t wait for Opening Day and the start of the baseball season. And, even if his favorite Boston Red Sox aren’t doing well, this 18-year-old high school senior from Norwood, Mass., says he’ll never waver in his devotion. He has good […]

April 5, 2013
2
Contributors

In addition to posts written by Dana-Farber staff, Insight also occasionally features guest posts from patients, family members and others touched by cancer. If you would like to share your thoughts or experiences, please let us know. You can email the blog editors at insight_blog@dfci.harvard.edu. Please include your name, best way […]

February 4, 2013
0
Care for children
Nine Tips for Talking To Kids About Cancer

 Helping a loved one face cancer is never easy, but the challenge is especially daunting when the patient is your own child. Our clinicians at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center work with pediatric cancer patients and their families every day. Lisa Diller, MD, Anna Muriel, MD, and Jorge […]

October 25, 2012
0
Blood disorders, childhood , Care for children , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Faces of Childhood Cancer: Steven Clifford

Steven Clifford is an 18-year-old osteosarcoma survivor. A Boston native, he starts college at the University of California, San Diego this month. This is his story. Life is made up of many difficult decisions. However, imagine my surprise when I had to make a tough and potentially life changing decision […]

September 26, 2012
0
Patient Stories, Pediatric , Uncategorized
The Faces of Pediatric Cancer – Fernando Morales

Fernando Morales is a student athlete. Last year he was sidelined from the life he knew after he was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma. Now done with treatment Fernando is back with his teammates, sporting a positive outlook and a new appreciation for life. This is his story.  As a soccer […]

September 12, 2012
0
Patient Stories, Pediatric , Uncategorized
The Faces of Pediatric Cancer – Caitlynne McGaff

Caitlynne McGaff is an active 17-year-old. She owes a lot of her mobility to an innovative surgery she had at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center to treat her osteosarcoma. This is her story. When most people my age talk about a day they’ll never forget, they mention getting their […]

September 5, 2012
1
Care for children
A Doctor and a Dancer

As a cancer researcher, Kimberly Stegmaier, MD, says her chosen profession offers “the mystery and excitement of discovery.” And she says the same is true of her passion outside the laboratory: dance. “It’s a huge hook for me,” she says. Both in scientific research and in working on a dance […]

September 4, 2012
0
Care for adults , Care for children , Coping with Cancer
Making a party out of cancer

Every Sunday, the Cutter family holds a Chemofeast. The door to their home is open to any and all who wish to attend. It’s a day full of food, beverages, and a lot of laughter, and 15-year-old Blake Cutter gets to choose the menu. Then on Monday, his mother, Lois, […]

August 20, 2012
1
Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Life Interrupted: When cancer puts life on hold

Ben O’Clair was a college senior studying for finals when he first felt the twinges of pain in his side. A day later, the 21-year-old was in a hospital learning he had cancer. He left school immediately, moved back to his mother’s house in Holliston, Mass., and began arduous chemotherapy […]

July 10, 2012
1
Cancer research , Treatments and Procedures
Five reasons to be optimistic about the future of cancer treatment

It’s not always easy to recognize that we live in a golden age. Too often we fail to appreciate the amazing things going on around us because we‘re so caught up in day-to-day activities and pressing demands that we presume that the extraordinary is rather ordinary. So it may be […]

May 31, 2012
2
General interest
Bringing cancer care to Rwanda

By Lawrence Shulman, MD Dana-Farber, with our partners Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital, offers patients highly advanced treatments in modern facilities. Our patients also benefit from an excellent staff, clinical research, and extensive resources, and many of them survive cancer to live long and healthy lives. Is […]

February 9, 2012
1
Cancer research
The most talked about cancer stories of 2011

The face of cancer care in 2011 changed in encouraging and – in some cases – challenging ways. Here are some of the cancer stories that captured the most press attention in 2011.  A federal task force recommended against routine testing of healthy men for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which […]

January 24, 2012
0

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