Can Coffee Affect Colon Cancer Risk or Survival?

colon cancer, coffee

Colon cancer patients who drink several cups of coffee daily may have a significantly lower risk of recurrence after treatment and an improved chance of cure. That’s the provocative finding of a large study reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The research is the first to link colon cancer recurrence and coffee;  it comes on the heels of a number of reports in recent years suggesting coffee consumption may offer some protection against various types of cancer, including postmenopausal breast cancer, melanoma, liver cancer, advanced prostate cancer. However, the researchers, led by Charles Fuchs, MD, MPH, director of the …

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How to Stay Young and in Love as a Cancer Caregiver

Heather and Harry April 2011

By Heather Francis Some people worry when they get married that they won’t be able to handle the challenges of life as a couple. That won’t be a problem for my fiancé and me. Harry and I started dating in April 2011, when I was 24 and he was 25. Soon after, he started feeling fatigued, having night sweats, and getting nose bleeds. That October he found out he had Stage IV Hodgkin lymphoma. The doctors – prior to his coming to Dana-Farber – told Harry his cancer was easily treatable. He would have six months of chemotherapy, and the …

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How to Care for Your Skin After Cancer Treatment

skin care, cancer treatment

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may cause changes to your skin during and after cancer treatment. Follow these tips and check in with your doctor regularly to ensure your skin is in the healthiest condition possible throughout your cancer experience. Chemotherapy Dry skin is a common side effect of chemotherapy. If you experience dry skin, using mild soaps and lukewarm (not hot) water, cleansing lotions, and creams may help. You should also avoid hormone creams, such as hydrocortisone, which can be harmful to the skin. Moisturizers may also help combat dry skin. For the most effective results, apply moisturizer while your …

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Progress in the Treatment of Childhood Leukemia

Kimberly Stegmaier

Although treatments for childhood cancer patients are improving, cancer remains the leading cause of death by disease in children. Doctors and researchers are also focused on decreasing the toxicity of these treatments, which can have side effects years after a child finishes treatment. “The war against childhood cancer is hardly over,” says Kimberly Stegmaier, MD, a pediatric oncologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. “We need to do better.” Stegmaier, who focuses her research on identifying new drug targets and new drugs for leukemia, Ewing sarcoma, and neuroblastoma, recently discussed advances in childhood cancer treatment in a Science, Innovation, …

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One Teacher Aims to Climb His Own ‘Everest’ to Help Fight Cancer

During a year in which both his wife and mother battled cancer, Andrew Macrae often felt as if he were summiting a mountain. Now, to honor their journey and support Dana-Farber, Macrae is scaling the 29,029 feet needed to reach the peak of the world’s tallest mountain – Mount Everest – without nearing the Himalayas. Starting today, Macrae will hike to the top of Mount Washington in North Conway, New Hampshire, six times in six days, an endurance test totaling the height of Mount Everest. A Scottish-born fifth-grade teacher at the British International School of Boston, he hatched the idea …

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What Are the Most Common Cancers in Each Age Group? [Infographic]

cancer, infographic

As we age, the overall risk of cancer increases. However, the type of cancer for which we are at risk varies. For example, the likelihood of someone younger than 20 years old developing cancer is quite low; only 0.19 cases will be diagnosed per 1,000 children annually. If they do develop cancer, however, they are more likely to be diagnosed with cancers of the blood or brain and central nervous system. By contrast, approximately 16.5 cases will be diagnosed per 1,000 people age 50 and older, but the most prevalent cancers in that age group are breast, prostate, colon and lung. The …

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What Is AT/RT Cancer?

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An atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a very rare and fast-growing tumor of the central nervous system. AT/RT is part of a larger group of malignant tumors called rhabdoid tumors, which are found outside the brain, in the kidneys, liver and other locations. AT/RT is most commonly found in the cerebellum and brain stem, which control most of the body’s basic functions. Since AT/RT grows very rapidly, symptoms can develop quickly over days or weeks. Increased head size often occurs in infants due to swelling inside the brain. Other common symptoms of AT/RT include headaches, especially upon waking in the …

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What Questions Should You Ask When Cancer Treatment Ends?

The successful end of cancer treatment is a welcome milestone for any patient, but it’s also the beginning of an important new chapter. Here are some questions to ask your care team at the end of treatment to help you live well beyond cancer: Can I get a treatment summary and survivorship care plan? A treatment summary will usually include your cancer diagnosis and describe the medical care that you received. A survivorship care plan will describe follow-up screenings you might need, as well as preventive measures to help prevent future health problems. It may also offer tips for managing …

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You Are Not Alone: Supporting Siblings of Childhood Cancer Patients

When Phoebe Clark was 14-months old, she had little knowledge of what was happening to her brother, Harry. The 5-year-old had been diagnosed with a brain tumor and was undergoing multiple surgeries and radiation therapy at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. But a few years later, when Phoebe was 5-years old, her brother suffered a brain bleed and was back in the hospital. Suddenly, the hospital and the Jimmy Fund Clinic were not only at the center of Harry’s world, they were a major part of Phoebe’s life, too. “You really started to see the impact of what …

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Solving Puzzles with Cigall Kadoch

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Growing up in the San Francisco area, Cigall Kadoch, PhD, had a passion for puzzles. The daughter of a Moroccan-born, Israeli-raised father and a mother from Michigan who together developed an interior design business, Kadoch excelled in school and pretty much everything else. Above all, she loved to solve brain-teasers. In high school, however, Kadoch came up against a problem that defied solution. Breast cancer took the life of a beloved family caretaker who had nurtured her interests in science and nature. “I was deeply saddened and very frustrated at my lack of understanding of what had happened,” recalls Kadoch, …

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