Archive for Care for adults

Live Web Chat: Answering Questions on New Lymphoma Treatments

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Ann LaCasce, MD, a medical oncologist in the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Adult Lymphoma Program, answered a variety of questions about Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma during a live web chat hosted by Dana-Farber last month.

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Five Healthy Habits to Start the New Year

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Whether you’re trying to lose weight, gain weight, or just stay healthy, the New Year always brings a new set of goals and resolutions. While this change in lifestyle can often feel daunting, achieving goals does not have to be a solo mission.

“Let friends, family members and co-workers know what your goal is and what you are trying to do,” says Nancy Campbell, MS, exercise physiologist with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “Having these people around can give you the support you need to reach that goal.”

As you work out healthy goals for 2014, consider these five tips from Campbell and Dana-Farber nutritionist Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD:

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Lung Cancer Screenings for High-Risk Patients a ‘Move Forward’

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Experts with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) have recommended that current smokers and former-smokers who recently quit should undergo an annual low-dose CT scan to screen for lung cancer.

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Top 10 Insight Stories from 2013

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As 2013 comes to a close, we’re looking back at some of our favorite Insight posts from the last year. From inspiring patient stories to important research, here is our top 10 list:

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Hodgkin Lymphoma: Five Things You Need to Know

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Approximately 173,000 people in the United States are living with Hodgkin lymphoma, or are in remission. Less common than non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma (sometimes referred to as Hodgkin’s lymphoma) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes, an important cell in the immune system. This malignant B cell is known as the Reed-Sternberg cell.

Arnold Freedman, MD, clinical director of the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Adult Lymphoma Program, answers some questions about the disease:

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Chat Live with a Dana-Farber Lymphoma Expert

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Lymphoma: How do we treat it? Where are future therapies headed?

Ann LaCasce, MD

On Wednesday, Dec. 18, Ann LaCasce, MD, of the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Adult Lymphoma Program will answer your questions about lymphoma care in a live video webchat. The 45-minute chat starts at 1 p.m. EST and will air live on Dana-Farber’s YouTube page.

LaCasce will discuss current treatment options as well as future therapies for lymphoma.

If you have a question for Dr. LaCasce, email webchats@dfci.harvard.edu. You can also submit questions by sending us a Tweet @DanaFarber using the hashtag #DFCIWebchat.

Bookmark the webchat video page and tune in live on Dec. 18 at 1 p.m. EST. You can also add the event to your calendar or RSVP on Facebook.

Cancer Diagnosis Leads to Nursing Career

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By Maggie Loucks, NP-C

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 28, during my last semester of graduate school, I remember thinking that this had to mean something. I needed to turn an unfortunate situation into something positive, so I decided to pursue oncology nursing where I felt I could make a difference.  Read more

Video: Blogging Through Cancer

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When Tara Shuman was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2012, blogging was not the first thing that came to mind.

“I put together an email to my friends and family to tell them about my diagnosis, and I realized when writing the email that it was very therapeutic,” Shuman says.

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Managing the Holidays When You Have Cancer

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By Julie Salinger, LICSW

The holiday season is full of cheer, but it can also be stressful, especially for cancer patients and their family caregivers. In addition to the extra time spent on shopping, cooking, and socializing, family interactions may bring complex dynamics, old grievances, and varying expectations to the forefront. The pressure to be “festive” can make even the healthiest person weary.

Here are some tips for patients and their families for an enjoyable holiday season. Read more

What’s the Difference Between Donating Bone Marrow and Donating Stem Cells?

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Stem cell transplantation (sometimes called bone marrow transplants) is a treatment for certain forms of cancer, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, as well as other diseases. But before a patient can receive a transplant, stem cells must be collected from a donor (an allogeneic donation) or from the patient (an autologous transplant). Read more