Care for adults
Employee Elves Bring Holiday Cheer to Dana-Farber Patients

For many, the holiday season is a time of gift-giving, warm meals, and celebration. But, for families with limited financial resources who are dealing with cancer treatment, the holidays can be overwhelming and stressful. That’s where Ellen Casey-Magleby and Deborah Toffler, MSW, LCSW, come in. Casey-Magleby, program administrator for Social […]

December 17, 2014
0
General interest
Summer Camp Gives Nurse Insight into Challenges Facing Patients’ Children

Erin Silva, RN, BSN, has formed very strong connections with her adult patients at Dana-Farber/New Hampshire Oncology-Hematology (Dana-Farber/NHOH) in Londonderry, New Hampshire. However, the 30-year-old oncology nurse rarely saw the full impact of cancer on their children. After a stint at summer camp, she has a much better idea. Silva […]

December 10, 2014
2
Care for children , General interest
How a Navy SEAL Veteran Helps Kids with Cancer

Adam LaReau has seen courage. The 34-year-old Navy SEAL combat veteran spent 11 years serving his country, and has seen courage in the actions of his fellow SEALS and through the children of fallen comrades who must learn to grow up without their fathers. Now living in Boston, LaReau has […]

November 11, 2014
3
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Health and Wellness
Post-Traumatic Stress and Cancer

Many associate post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, with veterans returning home from war, or those involved in similarly violent scenarios. But PTSD can occur after any life-threatening traumatic event – including a serious illness like cancer. “It’s common for cancer patients, even if they don’t have full-blown PTSD, to have […]

August 13, 2014
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Google+ Hangout: Coping with Cancer as a Young Adult

Karen Fasciano, PsyD, director of the Young Adult Program at Dana-Farber, recently joined young adults with cancer from across the country for a Google+ Hangout to discuss the challenges of facing cancer as a young person. “Cancer is different when you are building your adult life,” said Fasciano. “[Cancer] can […]

August 8, 2014
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Five Tips for Managing Stress During Cancer Treatment

Everyone faces stress from time to time, but a cancer diagnosis can be particularly challenging for both the patient and the family members. “For many of our patients and survivors, they experience a great deal of stress related to their diagnosis, treatment, or fears of recurrence,” says Eric Zhou, PhD, […]

July 30, 2014
2
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , General interest
Helping Patients with a Few Good Laughs

As patients come through for their MRIs and CT scans, MJ Murphy, RN, BS, has roughly 15 minutes to sit and talk, discuss treatment, and hear updates on friends and family. It’s not much time, but Murphy always tries to coax a smile. “I love referring to the friends and […]

May 28, 2014
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Health Topics
Cancer Between the Lines

Young adults often have their sights set on the future, anticipating college, working at their dream job, or traveling. One place they don’t plan to be is in an infusion chair undergoing cancer treatment. Cancer disrupts everyone, but especially adults age 18-34 who are growing into adulthood and starting careers […]

May 23, 2014
0
Care for adults , Esophageal cancer , Gastrointestinal Cancer
Esophageal Cancer: Five Things You Need to Know

Although it is not a common disease, esophageal cancer affects about 18,000 new patients each year in the United States. Typically, the disease is found more often in men than in women, with men having about a ten-fold higher risk of developing esophageal cancer. “Esophageal and gastric cancers are some […]

April 7, 2014
32
Breast cancer , Cancer research , Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Young Woman with Breast Cancer Finds Dream Team

A young woman in her prime, with a full life and meaningful career, does not expect a cancer diagnosis. But that is what happened to 34-year-old Erin, who received the news when she was in Paris with her mother and sister, on a long-awaited trip to celebrate Mother’s Day.

April 3, 2014
0
Cancer research , General interest , Health Topics , Risk and Prevention
DNA Test May Offer Alternative to Pap Smear

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel has recommended that a DNA test should be the primary screening tool for cervical cancer, rather than the traditional Pap smear. The DNA test detects the DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV), the sexually transmitted infection that causes almost all cases of cervical cancer. […]

March 17, 2014
3
Care for adults
How to Discuss Difficult Medical Decisions with Your Family

By Bethany-Rose Daubman, MD As a palliative care physician, part of my job is to help foster communication among family members making difficult health care decisions. This often relates to end-of-life matters, a topic I’ve grown comfortable with. In the department of psychosocial oncology and palliative care at Dana-Farber, my colleagues […]

February 26, 2014
10
Care for adults , General interest , Health Topics , Testicular cancer
How Does Testicular Cancer Affect Fertility and Sexuality?

Although there were fewer than 8,000 cases of testicular cancer in the United States in 2013, the disease often creates major concerns about fertility and sexuality for men of all ages.

February 5, 2014
0
Cancer research , Care for adults , Care for children , General interest , Health Topics
Top 10 Insight Stories from 2013

As 2013 comes to a close, we’re looking back at some of our favorite Insight posts from the last year. From inspiring patient stories to important research, here is our top 10 list:

December 27, 2013
0
Cancer research , Diet and Nutrition , General interest , Health Topics
New Study: Nuts Linked to Reduced Risk of Pancreatic and Other Cancers

An analysis of data from the decades-long Nurses’ Health Study revealed that women who ate a one-ounce serving of nuts – any kind of nuts – two or more times a week had a 35 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer than women who abstained from them. That’s a significant […]

December 18, 2013
1
General interest , Health Topics
Seven Tips for Staying Healthy During the Holidays [Infographic]

As the holiday season fills with family gatherings, travel and potluck parties, it is important to be extra attentive to avoiding germs. In addition to getting a flu shot, there are a number of other ways to prevent illness. Candace Hsieh, RN, CIC, of Dana-Farber’s Center for Patient Safety, offers […]

December 13, 2013
0
Caregiving , Psychosocial oncology, childhood , Uncategorized
Questions to Ask When Your Child Finishes Cancer Treatment

By Julia Pettengill Our daughter Sophie was diagnosed with leukemia at age 2½, and received two years of care at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. While I felt tremendous joy and relief when she completed treatment, I also found the experience traumatic.

December 6, 2013
2
Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Cancer Diagnosis Leads to Nursing Career

By Maggie Loucks, NP-C When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 28, during my last semester of graduate school, I remember thinking that this had to mean something. I needed to turn an unfortunate situation into something positive, so I decided to pursue oncology nursing where I felt I […]

December 2, 2013
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Health Topics
Managing the Holidays When You Have Cancer

By Julie Salinger, LICSW The holiday season is full of cheer, but it can also be stressful, especially for cancer patients and their family caregivers. In addition to the extra time spent on shopping, cooking, and socializing, family interactions may bring complex dynamics, old grievances, and varying expectations to the forefront. […]

November 26, 2013
1
Cancer research , Care for adults , Lung cancers
Lung Cancer: Five Things You Need to Know

Lung cancer develops in the tissue of the lung, usually in the cells that line the air passages. Here are some common questions about the disease, answered by Pasi A. Jänne, MD, PhD, Director of Dana-Farber’s Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology. What are the types of lung cancer? There are several types […]

November 4, 2013
8
Care for adults
How to Care for Your Central Line at Home

Cancer or blood disorder patients may have central lines, which make it easier to receive certain medications (such as chemotherapy) and have blood tests. The major types of central lines include Port-A-Cath, Hickman, and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Patients receiving stem cell transplants sometimes have central lines. If you have a central […]

October 25, 2013
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
How to Prepare for Your First Visit with a Cancer Specialist

By Karen Lee Sobol I used to think of hospitals as halls of science. But recently I learned the word “clinic” comes from the Greek, meaning “bedside art.” While we’d all rather avoid a visit to a cancer clinic, there’s a lot we can do to make the first visit a […]

October 23, 2013
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Easing the Way for Cancer Patients with Other Hardships

By Christopher Lathan, MD, MS, MPH When cancer strikes someone who is already facing other hardships – for example, he or she is poor, alone, or has a language barrier – the experience is very different than it might be for someone who has more resources and support. The Cancer […]

October 21, 2013
0
Cancer research , Care for adults , Care for children
Video: Nearly 100 Patients Inspire Others with Stories of Hope

Each year, Dana-Farber patients join clinicians, staff, and the Boston Red Sox to share their stories of inspiration and their belief in the research advances at Dana-Farber during the WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund Radio-Telethon at Fenway Park. This year, nearly 100 patients, including Rayquan Fregeau, who used art and resources from […]

October 18, 2013
0
Care for children , Survivorship
College and Cancer: Tips from a Student Survivor

By Catherine MacLean “Why is this coming up now?” “It’s been 10 years. I should be over this already.” “Why is this happening to me? All of the other survivors I know seem fine.” These thoughts preoccupied me during the transition from high school to college. It had been 10 […]

October 11, 2013
2
Care for adults , Caregiving , General interest
Four Lessons from a Cancer Caregiver

By Patrick Palmer In June 2001, my wife, Angela Palmer, was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer while we were living in Tucson, Arizona. This was a huge shock. She had annual mammograms and never had any indications of disease. She had a lumpectomy and completed about 50 percent of […]

September 30, 2013
8
Care for adults , General interest , Thyroid cancer
Thyroid Cancer: Five Things You Need to Know

By Melanie Graham Thyroid cancer is a disease in which malignant cancer cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland. Found more often in women, the National Cancer Institute estimates 60,022 new cases of thyroid cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2013. Like most forms of cancer, […]

September 25, 2013
14
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
How to Tell Your Children You Have Cancer

by Richard Saltus For many parents, their first concern after a cancer diagnosis is the impact it will have on their children. There’s a lot of medical information to digest and decisions to be made, including how and when to tell your children. There are good reasons talk to your […]

September 23, 2013
1
Breast cancer , Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Breast Cancer, a Convertible, and a Zest for Life

By Meg McCormick When I learned I had a stage 4 breast cancer, I decided not let it rob me of the opportunities to enjoy my life. I still have a physically active, socially engaged lifestyle, and if you have metastatic breast cancer, so can you.

August 28, 2013
17
Care for adults , Care for children , Treatments and Procedures
What is the Difference Between Palliative Care and Hospice?

Although the terms are often used interchangeably, palliative care and hospice care differ in several important ways for cancer patients – most notably, the stage of treatment at which they are given. Both types of care focus on relieving patients’ pain and discomfort, whether caused by the cancer itself or […]

August 23, 2013
2
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Dating and Cancer 101

by Amy Atwood SWF, Bald, Undergoing Chemo and Radiation… Oh yeah, isn’t that the first profile you would click on if you were searching for the love of your life or even just a new ‘friend’ online? Dating in itself – or, I should say, finding someone to date – […]

August 21, 2013
17
Care for adults , Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy Related Neuropathy: Managing this Nerve Wracking Problem

While chemotherapy can kill cancer cells, certain chemotherapy drugs can also cause an uncomfortable and distressing condition that may produce numbness, tingling, and discomfort in the arms or legs. This condition, known as peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), can make it difficult for people to perform day-to-day activities. Although there is no sure prevention […]

August 16, 2013
14
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Confronting the Mental Challenges of Cancer Treatment

by Richard Saltus Living with cancer is a physical and emotional challenge, but people may also find it hampers their thought processes and memory. Often the deficits are temporary, but sometimes they persist or appear months or years later as delayed effects. Cognitive difficulties, says Clare Humphreys, PhD, a neuropsychologist at […]

August 8, 2013
3
Cancer Genetics , Care for adults
Tips for Talking to Your Children About Genetic Test Results

There are many decisions parents face after testing for genetic cancer risk, including whether to tell their children and how to approach the conversation. If you decide to talk to your children about the test results, allow yourself some time to process the information; you want to be calm and […]

August 6, 2013
0
Care for adults , Treatments and Procedures
What Should I Expect for my PET/CT Scan?

By Melanie Graham Patients undergo different types of scanning procedures to produce detailed images of potential cancer growth. Depending on the cancer, physicians may use MRI, mammography, CT, PET/CT or other technologies. While some of these procedures use only x-rays or radio waves to create images, a PET/CT scan uses a […]

July 22, 2013
8
Care for adults , Care for children , Uncategorized
Revisiting Cancer Care in Rwanda: One Year Later

By Lori Buswell, RN I recently returned from a three-month rotation as a nurse fellow at a comprehensive cancer center at Butaro Hospital in Rwanda, a tiny African country known as the “land of a thousand hills.” The hospital, built and operated by the Ministry of Health and Partners In […]

July 2, 2013
1
Care for adults , Care for children , Palliative Care , Palliative Care, childhood
What You Should Know about Palliative Care

By Eric Schuller Palliative care is often misunderstood. People may associate it with end-of-life care or “giving up” – especially when facing a serious health challenge like cancer. But palliative care may not be what you think, and you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for it. Here’s a closer look […]

June 24, 2013
4
Care for adults , Care for children , Survivorship
Classes Help Survivors Move Beyond Cancer

Dana-Farber celebrates cancer survivorship in June with Living Proof, an annual series of events that includes workshops and programs as well as a keynote reception on June 20. The end of treatment is an important milestone for any cancer patient, but it can also be a time of anxiety. In […]

June 18, 2013
1
General interest
What’s the Difference Between Cancer Grade and Cancer Stage?

When solid tumors are diagnosed, they are often assigned a grade and a stage. The grade of a tumor is an indication of how quickly it is likely to grow and spread. In general, low-grade tumors grow slowly and higher-grade tumors grow more rapidly. Tumors are assigned a grade based […]

June 12, 2013
0
Care for adults , Health and Wellness , Uncategorized
Kelley Tuthill’s Tips for Choosing a Wig

By Kelley Tuthill Hair loss can be a jarring side effect of chemotherapy. When I was treated for breast cancer, I was nervous about my appearance and decided to wear a wig. At first it was a strange experience, but wearing a wig helped me face the day — and […]

May 30, 2013
0
Care for children , Coping with Cancer
Summer Fun for Kids with Cancer

By Caroline Rider For many families with children, summer is a time for vacations, outings, and fun. However, a summer vacation when your child has cancer can seem out of the question. But sometimes, a summer getaway is just what the doctor ordered.

May 28, 2013
2
General interest
Meet Boston Marathon Runner and Platelet Donor Wendy Akeson

By Saul Wisnia Wendy Akeson is passionate about both running and donating platelets. Never has she felt such a strong connection between these two roles as she did this year. Four minutes after completing her 10th consecutive Boston Marathon, Akeson heard the explosions that will forever link this year’s marathon […]

May 27, 2013
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
Should You Donate Tissue for Cancer Research?

By Eric Schuller If you recently learned you have cancer, donating a sample of your cancer tissue to science is probably the last thing on your mind. But it’s a topic that you might discuss with someone on your health care team, because cancer researchers often rely on donated tissue […]

May 21, 2013
2
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Why Join A Cancer Support Group

By Nancy Borstelmann, LICSW, MPH Having cancer can be isolating. Even if you’re surrounded by friends and loved ones, you may feel that no one understands what you’re going through. That’s why it can be helpful to join a support group attended by people who face a similar diagnosis, or […]

May 17, 2013
0
Health Topics , Uncategorized
How to Find Good Cancer Information Online

by Eric Schuller For many cancer patients, the Internet serves as a vital tool used to stay in touch with loved ones during treatment, find comfort and advice from other patients and caregivers, or even research clinical trials. But using the Web to learn more about a cancer diagnosis or […]

May 7, 2013
0
Care for adults
Do Older Adults with Cancer Need Special Care?

Just as Dana-Farber tailors treatment and support to children and young adults, the Older Adult Leukemia Program ̶  a specialized, clinical service  ̶  addresses the other end of the spectrum: adults who are 65 and older, and have blood cancer such as leukemia or other bone marrow disorders.

April 25, 2013
0
Care for children , General interest , Jimmy Fund Clinic
The Red Sox and the Jimmy Fund: A Winning Team for 60 Years

by Saul Wisnia Like many New Englanders, Fernando Morales can’t wait for Opening Day and the start of the baseball season. And, even if his favorite Boston Red Sox aren’t doing well, this 18-year-old high school senior from Norwood, Mass., says he’ll never waver in his devotion. He has good […]

April 5, 2013
2
Care for children , Coping with Cancer
You Have Cancer. You Are Beautiful.

Having cancer as a teen or young adult can throw your life off track. Just when you’re learning to drive, planning your prom, or playing your favorite sport, you find yourself sick, bald, and in the hospital. And you worry about your appearance – especially if you’re a girl.

April 2, 2013
9
Care for children
Five Ways to Support Families Dealing with Leukemia & Childhood Cancer

By Jane Roper When our five-year-old daughter was diagnosed with leukemia (ALL) last summer, our world was turned upside down. Extended hospital stays, twice weekly clinic visits, the side effects of chemo and the constant possibility of unexpected hospital admissions mean stress and exhaustion for all of us. And looming […]

March 28, 2013
43
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Six Tips to Help Young Adults Cope with Cancer

By Eric Schuller Getting cancer can be particularly difficult for young adults – classified by the National Cancer Institute as ages 15 to 39. Because the disease is relatively rare in this age group, these younger patients may find themselves isolated – too old to fit easily into childhood cancer programs, and […]

March 26, 2013
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Six Things to Do When You Learn You Have Cancer

By Nancy Borstelmann, LICSW, MPH A cancer diagnosis can put even the most organized person into a state of disarray. That’s not surprising, because it’s normal to feel overwhelmed and out of control in the face of such stress. But there are steps you can take to ensure you’re best […]

March 21, 2013
3
Cancer research , Treatments and Procedures
How Do Cancer Drugs Block Pathways?

by Richard Saltus    Cells are like young children – they need a lot of guidance on how to behave. Your body’s cells are constantly getting that help – in the form of hormones, growth factors, and other chemicals telling them when to rest, grow, duplicate their DNA, divide, or […]

March 19, 2013
1
Caregiving , General interest , Uncategorized
When It Comes to Cancer, Everyone Can Help

By Jim Donovan In 2002 my good friend died of cancer. He and I were at MIT together as undergraduates, where we shared a lot of great memories and developed a long-lasting friendship. Like most of us who walk with a loved one through a life-threatening disease, I experienced feelings […]

February 26, 2013
1
Care for adults
Getting a Second Opinion About Your Cancer Care

Most people seek opinions from experts when it comes to important matters, such as finances, children’s education, or a major purchase. Why not do so when it comes to your cancer treatment?

February 12, 2013
10
Care for adults
The Power of Listening to Cancer Patients

By Melissa Cochran, MS, NP For my cancer patients, a stem cell transplant is a life-changing event. They cannot work outside the home for a full year; visits to Dana-Farber are about the only excursions allowed. No more trips to the grocery store or dinners at a favorite restaurant. In our clinic, […]

February 7, 2013
7
Care for adults , Uncategorized
Five Questions to Ask A Cancer Patient-Talking With Someone Who Has Cancer

by Michael Buller Whenever I’ve met people with cancer, I’ve been at a loss for what to say and which questions to ask. Now, as a cancer patient, I realize the irony.

January 31, 2013
23
Care for adults , Chemotherapy , Uncategorized
Mental Fog, Chemotherapy Side Effect, Is Real and Often Treatable

Not long ago, doctors were often skeptical when cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy complained that they were mentally foggy; unable to plan a week’s worth of meals or organize their finances as they could before. Patients called this side effect “chemobrain” and were frustrated by the lack of recognition […]

January 25, 2013
7
Care for adults
Finding a Way to Help Cancer Patients – Again and Again

Bob Hurkett doesn’t know what became of the little girl he first heard of in 1998, but he thinks about her often. She was 5 years old and needed a bone marrow transplant. Hurkett and his wife, Jane, attended a donor drive hosted by the girl’s family where their blood […]

January 23, 2013
5
Care for adults , Care for children , Chemotherapy
Better Coverage for Oral Chemo: Why It Matters

When Gov. Deval Patrick signed an oral chemotherapy parity bill into law on January 5, Massachusetts joined more than 20 states requiring health plans to cover oral cancer pills at a rate no less favorable than standard intravenous (IV) chemotherapy. The new law tells insurers that they cannot require higher […]

January 15, 2013
8
Care for adults , Exercise
Exercise During Cancer: Getting Started

by Nancy Campbell, MS “How soon can I start exercising after I start cancer treatment?” It’s a question I hear often from patients who visit me for a fitness consult or class at Dana-Farber. My answer? “As soon as possible.” While it may seem counterintuitive, exercise offers key benefits for […]

January 8, 2013
13
Diet and Nutrition , Health Topics
Can I Eat Grapefruit When I’m Taking Prescription Medication?

by Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, CSO, LDN, and Elizabeth Lundy, DI Grapefruits are a good source of fiber, vitamin C, potassium, and other phytonutrients, but if you’re taking certain prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, you may need to choose other fruits.

December 20, 2012
0
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
Why I Open My Home to Strangers

by Anne Tonachel In 1997, when our children were all grown up, my husband Dick and I moved from the suburbs to Cambridge, right near many Boston hospitals. We bought a condo with an extra bedroom, and we shortly thereafter read about Hospitality Homes in the paper. Getting involved with […]

December 13, 2012
15
Care for adults , Care for children , General interest , Health Topics
Coping with the Holidays When Grief Is New

It’s hard to believe that the holidays are upon us – again. The stores are overflowing with holiday goods as families gear up for their celebrations. However, if someone you love has recently died, thinking about the holidays may bring you anguish. What were once happy times might now fill […]

December 11, 2012
4
Care for adults , Care for children
Why You Need a Health Care Proxy

What would happen if you were accidentally knocked unconscious and had to be taken to the emergency room? Would doctors know who to go to with questions about your care? A health care proxy form is a legal document that names a trusted person who can make medical decisions for […]

November 27, 2012
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
Connecting Online With Someone in Your Shoes

“Stay positive, I know it helps.” “What steps would you suggest I take to support my dad through all of this?” “I am a new member of this group.” These conversations are occurring online, at any time of day, in a community most people would not want to join: A […]

November 6, 2012
0
Care for adults , Metastatic breast cancer , Patient Stories, Adult
Being Grateful in the Face of Cancer

By Lola Baltzell I have been a metastatic breast cancer patient at Dana-Farber for over four years now. “Metastatic” means the cancer has spread beyond the breast. I have an amazing team of providers, especially my oncologist Ann Partridge and nurse practitioner Anne Kelly.

October 30, 2012
0
Care for children
Nine Tips for Talking To Kids About Cancer

 Helping a loved one face cancer is never easy, but the challenge is especially daunting when the patient is your own child. Our clinicians at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center work with pediatric cancer patients and their families every day. Lisa Diller, MD, Anna Muriel, MD, and Jorge […]

October 25, 2012
0
Breast cancer , Uncategorized
Fun with Pink

It was glitter and glue when patients, visitors, and Dana-Farber staff gathered on Oct. 4 to create art on an unusual canvas – bras. Hosted by Friends’ Place and Dana-Farber’s Creative Arts Program, the “Decorate a Brassiere” art therapy event allowed attendees to creatively honor Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

October 5, 2012
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
How to Build a Support Network

By Lola Baltzell People often ask me: How do you manage to live with metastatic breast cancer? One of the most important strategies for me has been building a support network. My diagnosis of breast cancer that had already spread to my bones came out of the blue. I had […]

September 25, 2012
1
Care for adults , Caregiving
10 Ways to Help a Friend With Cancer

When a friend is diagnosed with cancer, your first reaction may be, “How can I help?” However, answering that question may be difficult. Some friends may be public about their health, and about what they need, while others may be more private.

September 11, 2012
0
Care for adults , Caregiving
7 Tips to Remember When Visiting Cancer Patients

When we are sick, the kindness of others carries us through. Visits from those we love provide comfort and a hand to hold. But for Cindy Hale, healing meant limiting contact with family and friends. Hale underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplant in 2002, leaving her immunocompromised – with a weakened […]

August 9, 2012
0
Care for adults , Care for children , Health Topics
Summer brings greater need for blood, platelet donations

One of the easiest and most effective ways to help cancer patients is to give blood. There is a constant need for donations, but especially so in the summer when people are on vacation and unable to donate. One pint of blood can save up to two lives, and one […]

August 7, 2012
0
Cancer research , Care for adults , Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia
Doctor/patient team fight rare cancer

By Karen Lee Sobol I recently learned that the word “patient” shares a Latin root with the word “compassion.” Any one of us can become a patient, for a number of reasons. For me, hearing a diagnosis of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia flipped a switch. I became a patient in a big way.

August 2, 2012
4
Care for adults , Health and Wellness
Reclaiming sexuality after cancer

If you’re diagnosed with cancer, you’ll probably get used to people asking about your health. And whether you’re fielding the concerns of well-meaning friends and family or the professional interests of your care team, you’ll gradually learn what responses to give. But many cancer patients and survivors choose to keep […]

July 26, 2012
0
Care for adults , Survivorship
Tips every new cancer survivor should know

In celebration of Living Proof week, Insight honors cancer survivors with daily posts about survivorship.  When I was discharged from the hospital in 1996 after undergoing a stem cell transplant to treat leukemia, I was terrified. Yes, I’d survived cancer treatment, but now I had to deal with something even scarier: the unknown. If you’ve recently […]

June 22, 2012
1
Care for children , Patient Stories, Pediatric , Survivorship
A cancer survivor at age 9

In celebration of Living Proof week, Insight honors cancer survivors with daily posts about survivorship. To look at 9-year-old baseball player and Lego champion Charlie Rider, you’d never guess he’d had cancer for nearly half his life.

June 21, 2012
0
Care for adults , Survivorship
A comprehensive approach to care for cancer survivors

In celebration of Living Proof week, Insight honors cancer survivors with daily posts about survivorship.  The United States today is home to an estimated 12 million cancer survivors, thanks largely to advances in cancer treatment. But the end of treatment is not the end of the cancer experience. For many cancer survivors and caregivers, the […]

June 18, 2012
0
Care for children , Coping with Cancer
Therapy dogs bring smiles to kids with cancer

With the pitter patter of small feet, Phil makes his way through the halls of Boston Children’s Hospital. He walks with a purpose, boarding the elevator that takes him to the oncology floor for his next appointment. Phil is a new face in 6 North, the oncology unit at Dana-Farber/Boston […]

June 14, 2012
5
Coping with Cancer , General interest , Health Topics
Tips for Traveling If You Have Cancer

For most people, a cancer diagnosis brings the daily routine of life to a grinding halt, at least temporarily. But after the initial shock wears off, many patients strive to resume their everyday activities, including vacation or travel plans. Being treated for cancer doesn’t necessarily mean cancelling your summer vacation. […]

May 24, 2012
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer
How to help your kids cope with your cancer

For people with cancer, deciding how, and what, to tell others about the diagnosis can be a challenge. How do you tell your loved ones, or your employer, that you have cancer? For parents, there’s another degree of difficulty: What do you say to your children? How much will they […]

May 15, 2012
0

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