Young Patients Create Global Artwork

Although childhood cancer is relatively rare in the United States, around 200,000 children and adolescents are diagnosed with cancer worldwide each year. Of those cases, approximately 80 percent occur in low- and middle-income countries, which average a 20 percent survival rate. The remaining 20 percent of diagnoses are in high-income countries, which average an 80 percent survival rate.

In anticipation of International Childhood Cancer Day on February 15, patients at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center recently participated in craft activities that represented some of the 21 countries where the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) works to improve outcomes for children with cancer and blood disorders. GHI’s efforts span the globe, with partnerships in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, South America, the Caucasus Region, Central America and the Caribbean.

International Childhood Cancer Day
Aurora shows off her hand-painted maraca, a percussion instrument representing the music of Central and South America. Photo credit: KC Cohen 
With a little help from his mom, Adriana, Deivid creates a paper plate weaving project that represents the basket weaving of Liberia.
With a little help from his mom, Adriana, Deivid creates a paper plate weaving project that represents the basket weaving of Liberia. Photo credit: KC Cohen
International Childhood Cancer Day
Nisaiah tries out his hand-painted maraca, which represents the musical culture of Central and South America. Photo credit: KC Cohen
Arts and crafts supplies
Some of the paint supplies used by Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s patients, who participated in craft activities recognizing International Childhood Cancer Day. The crafts included hamsas (representing the Middle Eastern countries), paper plate weaving projects (representing basket weaving of Liberia) and maracas (representing the music of Central and South America). Photo credit: KC Cohen