Cancer research , General interest
Is Cancer More Serious If You Also Have Another Disease?

When cancer develops in someone with other diseases, it can be more serious, according to a recent annual report from several national cancer organizations. “Cancer does not occur in isolation,” says Lawrence Shulman, MD, in commenting on the report. “It occurs in a human being, who may have other medical problems.”

January 27, 2014
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Care for adults , Care for children , General interest
What’s the Difference Between Donating Bone Marrow and Donating Stem Cells?

Stem cell transplantation (sometimes called bone marrow transplants) is a treatment for certain forms of cancer, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, as well as other diseases. But before a patient can receive a transplant, stem cells must be collected from a donor (an allogeneic donation) or from the […]

November 22, 2013
1
Cancer research , General interest , Health and wellness
Can a Vasectomy Increase a Man’s Risk of Prostate or Testicular Cancer?

By Mark Pomerantz, MD There has been some uncertainty surrounding this question, but recent studies have demonstrated that having a vasectomy has no effect on the risk of prostate or testicular cancer. Older data – from studies tracking disease rates across broad population groups – suggested a modest connection, while […]

November 8, 2013
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