Tag Archive for LifeWithCancer

Classes Help Survivors Move Beyond Cancer

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Dana-Farber celebrates cancer survivorship in June with Living Proof, an annual series of events that includes workshops and programs as well as a keynote reception on June 20.

The end of treatment is an important milestone for any cancer patient, but it can also be a time of anxiety. In fact, some new cancer survivors say leaving the routine of regular visits with their health care team can be downright scary. That’s why Dana-Farber and other leading cancer centers offer programs to help survivors transition from active treatment to living well beyond cancer. Read more

Clinical Trials for Cancer Patients

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By Ian Krop, MD, PhD

Clinical trials are scientific studies in which new treatments – drugs, diagnostic procedures, and other therapies – are tested in people to find out if they are safe and effective. Nearly all cancer drugs in use today were tested in clinical trials. Read more

Kelley Tuthill’s Tips for Choosing a Wig

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By Kelley Tuthill

Hair loss can be a jarring side effect of chemotherapy. When I was treated for breast cancer, I was nervous about my appearance and decided to wear a wig. At first it was a strange experience, but wearing a wig helped me face the day — and a TV audience. Here are five tips I learned for selecting a wig and wearing it with confidence. Read more

Why Join A Cancer Support Group

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By Nancy Borstelmann, LICSW, MPH

Having cancer can be isolating. Even if you’re surrounded by friends and loved ones, you may feel that no one understands what you’re going through. That’s why it can be helpful to join a support group attended by people who face a similar diagnosis, or are in your peer group.

Here are some of the benefits support groups can offer. Read more

Do Older Adults with Cancer Need Special Care?

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Just as Dana-Farber tailors treatment and support to children and young adults, the Older Adult Leukemia Program  ̶  a specialized, clinical service  ̶  addresses the other end of the spectrum: adults who are 65 and older, and have blood cancer such as leukemia or other bone marrow disorders. Read more

You Have Cancer. You Are Beautiful.

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Having cancer as a teen or young adult can throw your life off track. Just when you’re learning to drive, planning your prom, or playing your favorite sport, you find yourself sick, bald, and in the hospital. And you worry about your appearance – especially if you’re a girl. Read more

Six Tips to Help Young Adults Cope with Cancer

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By Eric Schuller

Getting cancer can be particularly difficult for young adults – classified by the National Cancer Institute as ages 15 to 39. Because the disease is relatively rare in this age group, these younger patients may find themselves isolated – too old to fit easily into childhood cancer programs, and too young to find peers in adult clinics (most people diagnosed with cancer are 55 or older).

But the outlook is getting brighter. Read more

Six Things to Do When You Learn You Have Cancer

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By Nancy Borstelmann, LICSW, MPH

A cancer diagnosis can put even the most organized person into a state of disarray. That’s not surprising, because it’s normal to feel overwhelmed and out of control in the face of such stress. But there are steps you can take to ensure you’re best prepared for the road ahead. Don’t forget to: Read more

Seven Tips for Life After Stem Cell Transplant

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By Maria Pearson

As a technology teacher who had a long career with IBM before going into education, I have encountered all sorts of opportunities to teach – and to learn. The biggest such opportunity of my life occurred at the intersection of cancer, technology, and Dana-Farber.

In August 2010, I was diagnosed with stage III multiple myeloma, a blood cancer. No search engine was adequate in comforting my fears of life expectancy, treatment, or facing a stark life-altering challenge.

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Getting a Second Opinion About Your Cancer Care

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Most people seek opinions from experts when it comes to important matters, such as finances, children’s education, or a major purchase.

Why not do so when it comes to your cancer treatment? Read more