General interest
What Is Combination Therapy?

Combination therapy, the use of more than one type of therapy in treating a patient, is a hallmark of cancer treatment. The complexity of the disease – its tendency to spread beyond its original site and become resistant to certain drugs, and its genetic diversity – underscores the need for […]

November 7, 2016
0
General interest
Dana-Farber Scientist ‘Rises from the Ashes’

Two decades ago, Dana-Farber blood cancer researcher Sophia Adamia, PhD, left her home in Georgia, a country with a turbulent past located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe. Not until last May did she return to Georgia, to participate in a conference organized by the State Minister […]

November 4, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Is a Reduced-Intensity Stem Cell Transplant?

A reduced-intensity stem cell transplant, also known as a ‘mini’ transplant, is a modified form of a procedure that replaces a patient’s blood-forming stem cells with those of a compatible donor. Mini-transplant patients receive lower doses of chemotherapy than are used in a full-intensity, or myeloablative, transplant, and, in general, […]

November 3, 2016
0
General interest
Tips for Coping with Grief After a Cancer-Related Death

By Rosemary Maconchie When my husband Jim died from stage IV pancreatic cancer in April 2015, I was suddenly without my lifelong partner. We were together since high school; and when he died at age 69 I was suddenly alone for the first time in my life. The experience of […]

November 2, 2016
0
General interest , Health and wellness
Do Concussions Increase the Risk of Brain Tumors?

With football season in full swing, concussions and their long- and short-term consequences promise to be in the news. While the harmful effects of repeated concussions, especially among teens and young adults, have been well documented, any links between concussions and brain cancer are less clear. Multiple studies have endeavored […]

November 1, 2016
0
General interest
Does Drinking Alcohol Cause Liver Cancer?

Worldwide, more than 700,000 people are diagnosed with liver cancer – a leading cause of cancer death – each year. In the U.S., 39,230 people are projected to be diagnosed with primary liver cancer in 2016, causing an estimated 27,170 deaths. Does drinking alcohol play a role in the development […]

October 31, 2016
0
General interest
What Is Neoadjuvant Therapy?

Neoadjuvant therapies are drug treatments breast cancer patients receive before surgery. These treatments can help shrink tumors and make breast surgery easier for the patient and surgeon, according to Harold Burstein, MD, PhD, a breast cancer specialist in the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber. Neoadjuvant therapy […]

October 28, 2016
0
Cancer research
What Are Tumor Markers?

Blood tests for the presence of substances called tumor markers can be helpful in diagnosing cancer and assessing how well treatment is working. But such tests alone generally can’t tell for certain whether someone has cancer or not. That’s why they are used in conjunction with other methods, such as […]

October 27, 2016
0
Health and wellness
How Writing Helps During Cancer Treatment

By Rebecca Berman During my ongoing treatment for metastatic endometrial carcinoma, I tried many different mindful activities, such as yoga and other integrative therapies, but I came to a point where I felt that I needed to up my game. In the past, creative writing had helped me express and […]

October 26, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Is Whipple Surgery?

Many pancreatic cancer patients are diagnosed after the cancer has spread beyond the pancreas, making surgery a risky treatment option. But for those patients whose cancer is localized, surgery may be used to remove the tumor and prevent further spread. When the tumor is confined to the head or neck […]

October 25, 2016
0
Care for adults
Living a Full Life after Inflammatory Breast Cancer

When Trish Vickery learned in 2013 that she had inflammatory breast cancer, she knew all too well the gravity of her diagnosis. Her mother had died from the disease. Yet Vickery is living a full and energetic life — working, traveling, exercising, rowing on the Charles River in Boston, and […]

October 24, 2016
0
Cancer research
Immunotherapy Beats Chemotherapy for Advanced Bladder Cancer Patients

The immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda) is the first therapy of any kind to improve survival in patients whose metastatic bladder cancer worsened after treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. Keytruda proved so much better than chemotherapy in this “second-line” use that an international clinical trial was halted when the advantage became apparent. […]

October 21, 2016
0
Cancer research
Drug Prolongs Remissions in Some Relapsed Ovarian Cancers

For women with relapsed ovarian cancer that responds to platinum-based chemotherapy, a drug that hampers cancer cells from repairing damaged DNA can significantly lengthen the period in which the disease is held in remission, according to a new study by Dana-Farber researchers and international collaborators. In a phase three clinical […]

0
Care for children
Post-Cancer, Post-Rotationplasty, Teen Athlete Continues to Excel

The ball leaps off the metal bat with an unmistakable “ping” that denotes good contact. Miles Goldberg runs to first base, from which the 13-year-old will soon contemplate – and safely execute – a steal of second. Miles is used to transitioning naturally with the seasons from football to hockey […]

October 19, 2016
1
Care for adults
What Are the Symptoms of Leukemia?

While leukemia, a cancer of the blood cells, is one of the more common cancers in children, it occurs most frequently in older adults. More than 60,000 new cases of adult leukemia are estimated in the United States for 2016. These cancers are classified as either acute, which means the […]

0
Care for adults
How Much Radiation Do Breast Cancer Patients Need?

Traditionally, patients with early-stage breast cancer who choose lumpectomy plus radiation therapy have been treated with five to six weeks of daily radiation therapy following surgery. In the last half dozen years, however, two landmark studies by researchers in the United Kingdom and Canada found that treating patients with higher […]

October 18, 2016
0
Care for adults
Stem Cell Transplants Rise Among Older Patients

  Stem cell transplantation following chemotherapy can extend survival and potentially cure certain advanced cancers. Although these demanding procedures were once considered too risky for older patients, advances in transplant methods are challenging that assumption. “In transplants involving donor cells, there was concern that older patients wouldn’t be able to […]

October 17, 2016
0
Cancer research , General interest
What Can Be Learned from Clinical Trials that Fail?

When a clinical trial shows that a new treatment is no better than the standard, it can be disappointing. But such outcomes yield valuable, potentially lifesaving information. Trials can “fail” if the experimental therapy doesn’t work better than current treatments. These “negative” outcomes are important for several reasons. They can […]

October 14, 2016
0
Care for children
Tips for Sharing a Child’s Cancer Diagnosis with Others

No one is prepared to tell a loved one they have cancer. But the conversation becomes even more difficult when it’s your child who is diagnosed. How should parents and patients tell family members and friends, and who should be taking the lead? While there are some universal recommendations, much […]

October 13, 2016
1
General interest
Exercise and Metastatic Breast Cancer: Tips from a Survivor

By Sandy Cassanelli Finding out I had breast cancer in 2013 was very hard; learning two years later that my cancer was metastatic was even more distressing. But both times, exercise helped me face my situation. I was in the best shape of my life when I was diagnosed at […]

October 12, 2016
2
General interest
Pain Medication and Cancer: What You Need to Know

Cancer and its treatment cause pain for many patients, whether from the location of a tumor, the tumor spreading to another area such as the bones, or from side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. “Each person is unique in their pain experiences, as well as how they respond to […]

October 11, 2016
0
Care for adults , General interest
For 91-Year-Old Dana-Farber Volunteer, Serving Cancer Patients is a Proud Privilege

Ingersoll “Sandy” Cunningham has the dignified, silver-haired appearance of a man you’d expect to find sipping iced tea at the country club. So what is this Harvard-educated great-grandfather doing pushing food carts through the hallways of Dana-Farber, handing out sandwiches to patients? “You’ve got to have some objective when you […]

October 10, 2016
0
Care for adults
What is the Difference Between Small Cell and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

Lung cancer is divided into two general categories based on its appearance under the microscope: small cell and non-small cell. Non-small cell is the more common type and currently accounts for about 87 percent of lung cancers. Doctors make a distinction between the two types of lung cancers because treatment […]

October 7, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
What Are Aromatase Inhibitors?

Aromatase inhibitors are drugs given to patients with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer (HR+). They target the aromatase enzyme, which helps produce female hormones such as estrogen. Estrogen drives the growth of many HR+ tumors, and these drugs help control estrogen production, says Harold Burstein, MD, PhD, a breast cancer specialist in […]

October 6, 2016
0
Care for children
How Boston and Dana-Farber Gave This Family Hope

By Ricardo Garcia On Nov. 29, 2011, cancer changed our lives. My son Richi was diagnosed in Barcelona with a high-risk medulloblastoma, one of the most aggressive brain tumors. From that day on, we did not return home. We could never imagine what awaited us. Richi endured a total of […]

October 4, 2016
0
Cancer research
Genetics vs. Genomics: What’s the Difference?

Gene, genetics, genome, and genomics all are derived from a Greek word – gen – meaning birth or origin. Almost every aspect of health and disease is influenced in some way by the inherited information in cells, written in the chemical code of DNA and packaged in distinct units known […]

0
Care for adults
Breast Cancer: When is Less Treatment Better?

By Eric Winer, MD When a woman learns she has breast cancer, and she has cancer treatment available to her, it is only natural that she and her doctor would choose a powerful course of action. And in many cases, this approach makes sense. However, aggressive treatments often come with […]

October 3, 2016
3
Care for children
Young Actor Plays Unexpected Role for Others with Neuroblastoma

Before he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma in 2014 at the age of 11, Noah Smith was a veteran of the children’s theater stage. The suburban Boston boy had been cast in ensembles. He’d played Kurt Von Trapp in “The Sound of Music.” Little did Noah know that he would soon […]

September 30, 2016
0
Cancer research
Ovarian Cancer: State of the Science

By Ursula Matulonis, MD This is an exciting time for those of us engaged in research and patient care for ovarian cancer. As we’ve learned more about this cancer – its early formation, molecular machinery, and the body’s defenses against it – we’ve also come to understand its weaknesses. An […]

September 29, 2016
0
General interest
What’s the Connection between Night Sweats and Cancer?

Night sweats are episodes of perspiration that occur at night while you are sleeping. People who experience this condition typically report waking with wet bedclothes or sheets, having an increased heart rate, and chills for 1-4 minutes. Menopause or a fever are leading causes of night sweats, but they can […]

September 28, 2016
1
Cancer research
What’s New in Cancer Immunotherapy?

Keeping up with progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy requires paying close attention. The number of approved drugs that help the body’s immune system fight cancer continues to grow, as does the list of different cancers in which immunotherapy is proving effective – in some cases yielding dramatically longer-lasting […]

September 27, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Are Adult Histiocyte Disorders?

Adult histiocyte disorders are a group of rare diseases that involve an over-production of white blood cells known as histiocytes, which destroy foreign substances and protect the body from infection. In adults, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is the most common of these diseases. LCH arises when specialized histiocytes called dendritic […]

September 26, 2016
0
Cancer research
Taking Action: Why One Cancer Patient Walks

by John O’Hara One day, I was sitting in a Dana-Farber waiting room, and I looked around at all of the people waiting with me. They were someone’s mother, father, sister, brother, child, neighbor, or friend — people just like me. And they were all facing what I was facing, […]

September 23, 2016
0
Care for children
Teaghan Swims through Leukemia Treatment

  Holding hands, 3-year-old Teaghan Bresnahan and her mom run the length of the lake-front dock. At the dock’s end, Teaghan lets go – and gleefully leaps into the air to land in the water with a satisfying splash. It may seem a typical summer scene. But for Teaghan, who […]

September 22, 2016
0
Health and wellness
What Is the Lymphatic System? [Infographic]

A vital structure to the human body, the lymphatic system is a complex and important part of the immune system that helps maintain fluid balance within our tissues. Acting as a filter, it pushes lymph (a clear, watery fluid that contains white blood cells, oxygen, and other nutrients) throughout the […]

September 21, 2016
1
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #5: Stupid Things People Say

Stupid things. We all say them. And cancer patients have heard them all — from the insensitive to the absurd, from nutrition tips to fertility advice, and just about everything in between. While patients can laugh (hopefully) at the remarks in hindsight, when they’re first said, they can cut deep, making […]

September 20, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Are the Most Common Blood Cancers in Adults?

Someone in the United States is diagnosed with a blood cancer every three minutes. The most commonly diagnosed blood cancers are non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and multiple myeloma.   Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma   Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a type of cancer that forms in […]

September 19, 2016
0
Care for adults
Dancing through a Cancer Diagnosis

  By Kara Robbins Stoughton My life with cancer began when I was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in August 2014. I’ve since had 24 chemotherapy treatments, six surgeries, 50 gained pounds, seemingly endless conversations about my bowels, and a recurrence that was diagnosed in January 2016. At my […]

September 16, 2016
0
Care for children
Carter Climbs to New Heights – with a Prosthetic Leg

  More than 50 feet above ground, a wire rope extends from one tree to another. High in the trees, seven-year-old Carter Mock fearlessly steps off a platform and places first one foot, then the other, onto the wire. Holding tight to hanging ropes for balance, he navigates across the […]

September 15, 2016
0
Care for adults
Can Marijuana Benefit Cancer Patients?

Marijuana occupies a complicated position among the substances used to alleviate symptoms associated with cancer and cancer treatment. On the one hand, nearly half of U.S. states, mostly in the far west, northeast, and upper midwest, have legalized Cannabis (the plant from which marijuana is derived) for medical purposes. Others […]

September 14, 2016
0
Cancer research
The Genomics Behind Blood Cancers and Other Blood Disorders

Many of the secrets of why precancerous conditions sometimes become cancerous are hidden in cells’ genes. At Dana-Farber, researchers are collecting tissue samples to see if they can pry open those secrets and unlock new treatment options for certain types of blood cancers and other blood disorders. They’re also exploring […]

September 13, 2016
0
Care for adults
An Aggressive Treatment for a Strong Patient

By Theresa Sullivan Barger After triathlete Betsy Feldmann felt pressure in her abdomen while running, which seemed “as if her insides were slipping,” she saw four doctors before being diagnosed with stage II-C ovarian cancer. Feldmann chose an aggressive approach recommended by Ursula Matulonis, MD, medical director of Gynecologic Oncology […]

September 12, 2016
0
Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast—Episode #17: The Latest in Brain Tumor Research and Treatment

Brain tumors can be among the most challenging cancers to treat. The blood-brain barrier, a natural defense mechanism that shields the brain from harm, can also prevent cancer treatments from reaching tumors. “It can be difficult to get treatments effectively into the brain,” says David Reardon, MD, clinical director of […]

September 9, 2016
0
Care for children
Dylan Discovers a New Sport During Cancer Treatment

Balloons of various colors are taped in a row across the wall. Twenty yards away, 8-year-old Dylan Berio announces “yellow,” pulls back the string of his bow, then releases – smiling as he hears the “pop.” His arrow successfully pierced the yellow balloon. Archery requires focus and precision – something […]

September 8, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Is ‘Watchful Waiting’ and When Is it Right for Prostate Cancer?

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 180,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, with African American men 60 percent more likely to develop the disease than other ethnic groups. Fortunately, the vast majority of prostate cancer diagnoses will be a slow-growing, highly treatable form of the […]

September 7, 2016
0
Cancer research
Do Hot Drinks Increase the Risk of Esophageal Cancer?

Based on a review of numerous scientific studies, the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) recently concluded that routine consumption of “very hot” drinks probably raises the risk of esophageal cancer. The review, by a panel of 23 experts around the world, found that drinking beverages such as coffee […]

September 6, 2016
0
Care for adults
Treatments for Ovarian Cancer: Finding Your Path [Infographic]

Ovarian cancer is a complex disease. Cell types, stages, and genetics play an important role for patients and their doctors as they decide which direction to take. Fortunately, patients today have many treatment options and new advances on the horizon. Physician-scientists at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers […]

September 5, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
Precursor Blood Condition Patient Pays it Forward

When Lori Kauzlarich discovered that she had a precursor blood condition in August 2013, she sprang into action. “I was stunned,” she says. “But I decided to advocate for myself.” Precursor conditions are blood disorders that may evolve into cancers such as leukemia, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia, and multiple myeloma. They are […]

September 2, 2016
0
Care for children
Cancer or No Cancer – Carlie Will Sing

Her voice at first sings softly, then gradually gains intensity and rises to a crescendo as she belts out the refrain of a tune she and her dad co-wrote: “You’re not standing alone!” 15-year-old Carlie Gonzalez has been singing and making music for as long as she can remember. But […]

September 1, 2016
0
Care for children
What Is Ewing Sarcoma?

Ewing sarcoma is a cancer that grows in the bones and soft tissues, usually in the thigh or pelvis. It is most common in children and young adults between the ages of 5 and 20, and more common in boys than girls. Although most patients are teenagers, Ewing sarcoma can […]

August 31, 2016
0
Cancer research
What is the Latest Research in Endometrial Cancer?

For endometrial cancer, as for virtually every form of cancer, advances in genomics are transforming the understanding and treatment of this disease, which arises in the lining of the uterus or womb. As part of the Profile research project at Dana-Farber, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Boston Children’s Hospital, investigators […]

August 30, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Are Neuroendocrine Tumors?

Once considered rare, the incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has risen over the past few decades. More than 100,000 people in the United States have neuroendocrine tumors, which exceeds the incidence of both pancreatic cancer and stomach cancer in the U.S. NETs are tumors that originate from neuroendocrine cells, which […]

August 29, 2016
0
Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast—Episode #16: The Latest in Prostate Cancer Treatment and Research

Prostate cancer affects 230,000 men each year. Although diagnoses are increasing worldwide, most people die with prostate cancer and not of prostate cancer, according to Mark Pomerantz, MD, a medical oncologist in Dana-Farber’s Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology. In this Cancer Conversations podcast episode, Pomerantz discusses genetics, risk factors, and […]

August 26, 2016
0
General interest
Is Itching a Sign of Cancer?

Itchy skin has many causes, including dryness and allergies, but only rarely does it signal that a person has cancer. This symptom may occur as a result of complications of the disease, and itchy, flaky skin and rashes are common side effects of some cancer drugs. Most skin cancers, such as […]

August 25, 2016
4
Care for children
What Is Neuroblastoma?

Neuroblastoma is a cancerous tumor found in young children and infants, most commonly in children under age 5 and rarely in those older than 10. Approximately 650 children in the United States are diagnosed with neuroblastoma each year. What causes neuroblastoma? The cause of neuroblastoma is not certain, but researchers […]

August 24, 2016
1
Care for adults
Leukemia Survivor Embraces Change

For Anna Heard, the fall of 2002 was a season of change. Set to move to Boston in September to begin a master’s program at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Heard, then 29, had a routine physical in Washington, D.C., before starting the academic year. Although her […]

August 23, 2016
0
General interest
15 Red Sox and Dana-Farber Moments through the Years

From Ted Williams to David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox players have had a tremendous impact on Dana-Farber patients and staff through the years. Here is a look at 15 of our favorite moments from the 63-year relationship between The Jimmy Fund and the Red Sox.  

August 22, 2016
0
Care for adults , Health and wellness
What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Throat Cancer?

Throat cancer is a type of head and neck cancer that may affect the larynx, the area of the throat used for speaking; the nasopharynx, the area of the throat behind the nose; or the oropharynx, the middle part of the throat. Symptoms vary depending on the location of the […]

August 19, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Inherited?

Most cases of pancreatic cancer develop for unknown reasons, but about 10 percent occur in families that have a strong history of the disease. That doesn’t mean that if you are a member of such a family you will develop pancreatic cancer, but rather that you are at a higher […]

August 17, 2016
1
General interest
What Are the Stages of Grief?

By Sue Morris, PsyD Traditionally, the stages of grief have been identified as denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. But do these stages really exist? What happens if you skip one? And how long does each last? These are all normal questions, especially if someone you loved has recently died […]

August 16, 2016
2
Care for adults
Mom with Breast Cancer Finds Care Close to Home

When Cathy McCue, 44, tried to find words to tell her 8-year-old twin boys about her cancer, she turned to books like “Mom Has Cancer” and “Nowhere Hair.” Her own story began in June 2015, when she felt a pain in her right breast while at the gym. After finding […]

August 15, 2016
1
Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast – Episode #15: What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer Treatment and Research

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, but lung cancer research is advancing rapidly and treatments are improving at an astonishing pace. “Lung cancer research has changed so much today that it’s even hard to estimate what we’re going to be doing in the future,” […]

August 12, 2016
0
Care for adults
Daughter Donates Stem Cells to Honor Dad’s Successful Transplant

Lauren Marsden joined DKMS/Delete Blood Cancer Registry during freshman orientation at St. Anselm’s College for the same reason she majored in nursing: She wanted to help others. What she couldn’t foresee then was how this decision would intersect with her own family’s experience. Two months after Lauren’s graduation in May […]

August 11, 2016
1
Cancer research
How Does Cancer Spread?

Cancer is most dangerous when it has spread, or metastasized, from its original site in the body. A tumor that began as an isolated mass – often treatable by surgery and/or radiation therapy – can become a dispersed, much more difficult to treat, malignancy. For cancer to spread, several steps […]

August 10, 2016
0
Care for children
New Treatment Protocol Boosts Survival in Pediatric Neuroblastoma Patients

When Emily Coughlin complained of a sore knee in May 2009, doctors initially suspected Lyme disease. After antibiotics failed to relieve the pain, the girl, who was just shy of her fourth birthday, was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a cancer that begins in nerve cells outside the brain and usually affects […]

August 9, 2016
2
Care for adults
Young Adult Finds Ways to Discuss Death

By Tara Baysol I was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2013 at the age of 27. Just prior to my diagnosis, I had started a new, exciting chapter as a Yale graduate student. My self-confidence was at an all-time high as I had survived my chaotic early 20s and was […]

August 8, 2016
0
General interest
Cancer Center Staff Send Gifts to Colleagues’ Marine Son in Kuwait

During their two decades as Dana-Farber nurses, Jeannine Sudol, RN, and Mary Delaney, RN, have watched each other’s children grow up through stories, photos, and the occasional visit. So when Delaney heard this spring that Sudol’s son, Dean, was being deployed to Kuwait with the Marines, she acted right away. […]

August 5, 2016
0
Care for adults
What is a Benign Blood Disorder?

It might sound counterintuitive, but not every patient comes to Dana-Farber for cancer treatment. For example, the Institute’s experts regularly see patients seeking help with benign (non-cancerous) blood disorders. Benign blood disorders such as anemia and sickle cell disease are often treated at cancer centers because such institutions are home […]

August 4, 2016
0
Care for adults , Health and wellness
Family Legacy of Service Fuels 20-Year PMC Rider

By Jen Cunningham Butler I began riding the Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) in 1996 in honor of my mother, Sheila Driscoll Cunningham. Twenty years prior, in 1976, Mom became Founding President of The Friends of Sidney Farber Cancer Institute (now Dana-Farber), raising funds for cancer research and patient care. Mom was […]

August 3, 2016
1
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #4: Exercise and Cancer

If you’re 69 and diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, what do you do? For John Barrett, the answer was easy: become a certified physical trainer. But as Barrett and Nancy Campbell, exercise physiologist at Dana-Farber, both point out, you don’t need to be an exercise zealot to incorporate exercise into your […]

August 2, 2016
0
Care for adults
Improving Sexual Health for Ovarian Cancer Patients

Treatment for ovarian cancer often comes with sexual side effects. Although curing the cancer is the main goal for many patients and their doctors, Sharon Bober, PhD, director of Dana-Farber’s Sexual Health Program, is focused on preserving a patient’s quality of life – including her sexual satisfaction. Bober, with co-investigators […]

August 1, 2016
0
General interest
Crane Project Fights Cancer with Creativity and Courage

When the Pfeifer family boarded a plane to Chicago in 2012, 996 paper cranes took flight with them. Nine-year-old Anna Pfeifer had learned a Japanese legend in school: whoever folds 1,000 origami cranes will be granted one wish. After learning that her grandfather had stage IV colon cancer, Anna set […]

July 29, 2016
1
Health and wellness
What Do Dana-Farber Nutritionists Eat?

Dana-Farber nutritionists help patients create and maintain healthy diets for all stages of treatment. They can provide meal plans, advice for managing treatment side effects, and tips for post-treatment wellness. But have you ever wondered what nutritionists like to eat? Here, Dana-Farber nutritionists share five of their favorite healthy breakfasts: […]

July 28, 2016
0
Care for adults , Health and wellness
Connecting with Nature and Other Patients after Leukemia

By Kathleen Barton When you get diagnosed with cancer, it kicks your butt – both the physical aspects of chemo and the general inertia that comes with this new thing you’re living with. Before my diagnosis, I was active – working, volunteering, exercising, and spending time with friends. Then some […]

July 27, 2016
0
Podcasts
Voices Podcast – Episode #5: Balancing Motherhood and Breast Cancer

It was a warm day in November 2013 when Gabby Spear found out she had breast cancer. But even in the midst of the difficult news, her responsibilities as a mom, wife, professional, and community member remained; she knew she still had to pick up her two daughters and make […]

July 26, 2016
0
Care for adults
What is an Angiogenesis Inhibitor and How Can It Be Used to Treat Cancer?

Tumors can’t grow any larger than the size of a pinhead unless the body generates a network of new blood vessels to nourish them – a process known as angiogenesis. So using drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors to block this process is an ingenious strategy with many potential advantages over standard […]

July 25, 2016
0
Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast—Episode #14—The Latest in Genetics and Women’s Cancers

Advances in genetic research may improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of women’s cancers. “More genes are being found and fewer families are having to wonder if there is something genetic that may increase their risk, or future generations’ risk, of developing cancer,” says Judy Garber, MD, MPH, director of […]

July 22, 2016
0
Cancer research
How Do PARP Inhibitors Work In Cancer?

PARPs (or Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases)  are proteins that play an important role in the life of a cell. When a strand of the DNA double helix is broken or damaged, PARPs  act as a repair crew to help fix the damaged site, allowing the cell to live. For healthy cells […]

July 21, 2016
0
Care for adults
‘Chemobuddies’ Help Breast Cancer Patient Heal

“What should I bring with me to chemo?” It’s a common question. For many cancer patients, the answer is books, puzzles, or a good movie. For Monica Wright, it was her “chemobuddies.” Wright, 44, was diagnosed with breast cancer in November 2015, and quickly found how comforting a friend’s presence […]

July 20, 2016
0
Care for adults
What Are the Differences Between Lymphocytic and Myelogenous Leukemia?

Leukemia arises from malfunctions in stem cells within the bone marrow that cause abnormal white blood cells to flood into the bloodstream. Leukemias are classified as either myelogenous (also called myeloid) or lymphocytic depending on which types of white blood cells are affected. If the abnormal cells are primarily granulocytes […]

July 19, 2016
0

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