Risk and Prevention , Skin cancers (non-melanoma) , Uncategorized
Find Skin Cancer Early: Know Your ABCDEs [Infographic]

With an estimated 8,500 new cases of skin cancer diagnosed in the U.S. every day, it is important that you not only protect yourself from the sun’s UV rays, but also regularly check your skin for anything out of the ordinary. While freckles and moles are often harmless, it is […]

May 2, 2016
0
Health Topics , Risk and Prevention , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
Does Elevation Increase Risk for Skin Cancer?

One of the most common questions asked about skin cancer risk, particularly by those who ski or hike, is whether altitude can increase the chance of developing skin cancer, specifically melanoma. We spoke with Jennifer Lin, MD, a dermatologist in Dana-Farber’s Melanoma Treatment Center, to learn more. Elevation does affect […]

May 20, 2015
1
Health Topics , Risk and Prevention , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
Screening Tips for Finding Skin Cancer Early

As we peel off winter clothing and head for the beach, it’s a perfect time to learn about the benefits of screening exams for melanoma and other skin cancers. Preventing these cancers with sun safety awareness is important – but so is detecting skin lesions in their earliest, most treatable […]

May 4, 2015
4
Care for adults , Research , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
What’s New in Skin Cancer Research?

Although malignant melanoma has been attracting much of the media spotlight because of promising new immunotherapy drugs, advances are also being made in other types of skin cancer. Nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are very common, with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed […]

March 18, 2015
3
Health Topics , Risk and Prevention , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
Five Ways to Reduce Skin Cancer Risk this Winter

Whether you’re escaping the chill with a tropical vacation or skiing the slopes, sun safety is still important in the winter months. Because UV rays can be harmful even in frosty temperatures, protecting your skin is a year-round responsibility. Allison Goddard, MD, of Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center for Skin […]

February 11, 2015
4
General interest , Health Topics , Melanoma , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
What’s the Difference Between Melanoma and Skin Cancer?

Many people consider skin cancer to be synonymous with melanoma. As May marks Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month, it is important to understand that melanoma is only one type of skin cancer; other forms of the disease are less aggressive and more common. Melanoma is the rarest form of […]

May 14, 2014
4
Cancer research , Care for adults , Care for children , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
Teens and young adults overlook skin cancer risk

The call of the beach is hard to ignore on sunny summer days. Yet many teens and young adults do not follow protection tips when they hit the sand. They remain the most difficult age group to convince that ultraviolet (UV) rays, which come from the sun and indoor tanning […]

July 2, 2012
1
Health Topics , Melanoma
The Truth About Melanoma & Skin Cancer: Facts & Common Myths

May is Melanoma Awareness Month. Often caused by excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight, melanoma accounts for only 4 to 5 percent of skin cancer cases, but is responsible for most skin cancer-related deaths. When detected and treated in its earliest stages, however, melanoma is often curable. The […]

April 26, 2012
56
Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
Skin Cysts and Cancerous Growths: What is the Difference?

New bumps or lumps on the skin can be concerning, especially if you aren’t sure whether it is a cancerous growth or a benign cyst. While it is often possible to distinguish between the two by touch and appearance, in some cases additional tests may be needed to determine which […]

October 10, 2017
0
General interest , Survivorship
If You Don’t Mind Me Asking — Dating, Post-Cancer

This post originally appeared in the Love U column of the Daily Trojan, the student newspaper of the University of Southern California. By Eva Grant I was talking to Dan on Tinder. A witty back and forth. I’m good at that. We were joking about a Greek myth. “So,” he […]

March 14, 2016
0
Care for adults , Chemotherapy , Health and Wellness , Health Topics
How to Care for Your Skin After Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may cause changes to your skin during and after cancer treatment. Follow these tips and check in with your doctor regularly to ensure your skin is in the healthiest condition possible throughout your cancer experience. Chemotherapy Dry skin is a common side effect of chemotherapy. If […]

August 14, 2015
0
Blood disorders, childhood , Immunotherapy , Uncategorized
CRISPR Enables Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Discovery

This originally appeared on Vector, Boston Children’s Hospital’s blog. A novel screening method using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology has revealed new drug targets that could potentially enhance the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer immunotherapy. The method, developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and […]

November 30, 2017
0
Integrative Therapies
How Giving Hand Massages to Cancer Patients Helps Them – And Me, Too

By Hilda Santos One day six years ago, my sister Palmira called me from Dana-Farber with an idea. Her husband, Bob, was in treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and a volunteer had just approached his chair asking if he wanted a hand massage during his chemotherapy infusion. Seconds later, Palmira was […]

November 14, 2017
0
Cancer Genetics , Immunotherapy , Precision Cancer Medicine
Treating Cancer by Location or Genetic Markers: Which is Better?

In the past, treating cancers involved classifying them primarily by the organ or tissue where they arose – like the skin, the lungs, the breast, or the colon. Today, it’s often possible to identify the genes and proteins responsible for a tumor’s growth, and, in some cases, to offer a […]

November 13, 2017
0
Melanoma , Patient Stories, Adult
Psychosocial Care Helps Amy through Cancer’s Mental Side

Cancer can feel like a slog — not just a physical one, but an emotional one, too. That’s how 56-year-old business owner Amy Macdonald describes the past year and a half living with metastatic melanoma. “The biggest changes in my life are the consequences of the treatment – fatigue, body […]

November 8, 2017
0
Breast cancer
Fact Check: Can Breast Implants Cause Cancer?

Some women choose to receive breast implants, for cosmetic reasons or breast reconstruction, following a mastectomy. But does this result in a heightened chance of developing cancer? Fact: Women with breast implants have an increased, but still extremely low, risk of developing anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL), a type of non-Hodgkin […]

October 17, 2017
0
Breast cancer , Patient Stories, Adult
From Healthcare Advocate to Breast Cancer Patient – And Back

When I was young, I wanted to be a doctor. I was the kid who would cry with my friends when they skinned their knees, and do whatever I could to comfort them. In college I learned there were other jobs in healthcare where I could help people, and I […]

October 2, 2017
0
Blood Cancer
What Are the Symptoms of The Rare Blood Cancer BPDCN?

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, or BPDCN, is a rare, aggressive blood cancer, with features of both lymphoma and leukemia. While it is somewhat similar to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), its unique characteristics include abnormal tumor cells that can be found in the blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, or skin. […]

August 31, 2017
0
Colon Cancer , Diet and Nutrition
Vitamin D: Can It Prevent or Slow Cancer?

Vitamin D may prevent or slow some types of cancer, according to some intriguing studies. However, the evidence is not yet definitive, and no recommendations currently exist on taking extra vitamin D to prevent cancer. Vitamin D is a nutrient that helps the body use calcium and phosphorus to build […]

August 29, 2017
0
Immunotherapy , Uncategorized
Cancer Immunotherapy: Taking Aim with Neoantigens

It’s a compelling idea that has attracted scientists for decades: rather than poison tumors with chemicals and radiation, use a biological agent – a vaccine – to rally the body’s formidable immune defenders to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Yet, even as other forms of immunotherapy are showing promise […]

August 9, 2017
0
General interest , Melanoma , Risk and Prevention
Is There a Connection between Cancer Medications and Increased Sunburn Risk?

By Nicole LeBoeuf, MD, MPH, clinical director of Dana-Farber’s Center for Cutaneous Oncology  While many people know that traditional chemotherapy drugs can increase sensitivity to the sun, some of the newer targeted therapies do as well. In fact, the risk of sun-related skin damage may be even higher with certain targeted […]

July 18, 2017
0
Cancer research , Melanoma , Skin cancers (non-melanoma)
New Tanning Drug Could Protect Skin From the Sun

Scientists may have figured out a way to let people tan safely – without involving the sun. In an effort to further develop preventative measures for skin cancers like melanoma, researchers from Dana-Farber and other health care organizations have developed a potential topical cream that stimulates skin cells to produce […]

July 10, 2017
3
Cancer research , Immunotherapy
In Check: Attacking Cancer from Many Fronts

As a pediatric dentist, Jay Schwab had a clear-cut enemy: dental disease in children and adolescents, and the apprehensions they faced in the dental environment. Cavities could neither hide from his drill nor fool his X-ray machine, and plaque could easily be scraped away. Generations of patients went away smiling […]

June 27, 2017
0
Blood disorders, childhood , Cancer research , Patient Stories, Pediatric
How Pediatric and Canine Cancer Similarities Can Help Both Children and Pets

In March 2016, Ollie the pug, a therapy dog at Boston Children’s Hospital, paid a bedside visit to 7-year-old Carter Mock. Both dog and boy lost limbs to osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. Ollie’s left front leg was amputated at the shoulder. After removing the tumor in Carter’s left […]

May 2, 2017
0
Health Topics , Risk and Prevention
How to Educate Kids About Cancer Prevention

While not all cancers can be prevented, there are a number of strategies and techniques to help reduce cancer risk, even for those with inherited cancer genes. It’s important to start implementing healthful habits early in life, and as a parent, to educate kids about the importance of cancer prevention. […]

February 14, 2017
0
Biliary cancer , Gastrointestinal Cancer , General interest
What Is Biliary Cancer?

Biliary cancer is a form of cancer that develops in the bile duct system, which connects the liver, gallbladder, and small intestine, moving bile – a fluid that helps digest fats – to the small intestine. While relatively uncommon, approximately 15,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with this […]

February 10, 2017
0
Cancer research , Research
Why Is It Difficult to Pinpoint the Exact Cause of a Person’s Cancer?

A diagnosis of cancer always comes as a shock, and the patient naturally asks the physician, why did this happen? Is it something I did or didn’t do, or did I inherit it, or were chemicals in the environment to blame? “Why patients develop cancers is not well known,” explains […]

January 23, 2017
0
General interest , Risk and Prevention
Does Having a Certain Personality Type Affect Cancer Risk?

It was once thought that people with certain personality traits were particularly susceptible to cancer. Neurotic people and introverts, in particular, were believed to be especially at risk for developing the disease. Personality type was also thought to play a role in whether people stricken with cancer would die of […]

January 4, 2017
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , General interest
Tips for Returning to Work after Cancer Treatment

A cancer diagnosis can cause significant changes to your life – including at work. Many patients have to stop working during treatment, take significant time off, or alter their schedules, all of which can take a significant mental, emotional, and financial toll. Some patients may have jobs that provide flexible […]

December 14, 2016
0
Cervical Cancer , General interest , Risk and Prevention
What Are AIDS-Related Cancers?

People infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS are more susceptible to certain types of cancer than people who are not infected. In fact, some types of cancers are so common in people with HIV that they are referred to as AIDS-related or AIDS-defining cancers – including Kaposi’s sarcoma, […]

December 1, 2016
0
Care for adults , Caregiving , General interest
In Sickness and in Health as a Cancer Caregiver

By Deb Osborne On that beautiful day in October, filled with all the excitement life has to offer, I didn’t realize how important those words would become. Caught up in the wonderment of our wedding day, the magnitude of those words did not resonate with me until seven years ago […]

November 28, 2016
1
Cancer research , Head and Neck Cancer , Immunotherapy
Use of Immunotherapeutic Expanded to Fifth Type of Cancer

This post originally appeared on Cancer Research Catalyst, the official blog of the American Association of Cancer Research. It was originally published Nov. 15, 2016. By Karen Honey, PhD On Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it had approved expanding the use of the immunotherapeutic nivolumab […]

November 15, 2016
4
General interest , Research , Risk and Prevention
Is Cancer Contagious?

While some may wonder, cancer is not contagious; a healthy person cannot catch cancer from a person who has the disease, nor can it be spread by close contact with a cancer patient. Cancer cells are far different from infectious agents such as bacteria and viruses. A cancer cell is […]

November 9, 2016
1
General interest , Health and Wellness
What’s the Connection between Night Sweats and Cancer?

Night sweats are episodes of perspiration that occur at night while you are sleeping. People who experience this condition typically report waking with wet bedclothes or sheets, having an increased heart rate, and chills for 1-4 minutes. Menopause or a fever are leading causes of night sweats, but they can […]

September 28, 2016
2
General interest , Health and Wellness , Risk and Prevention
Is Itching a Sign of Cancer?

Itchy skin has many causes, including dryness and allergies, but only rarely does it signal that a person has cancer. This symptom may occur as a result of complications of the disease, and itchy, flaky skin and rashes are common side effects of some cancer drugs. Most skin cancers, such as […]

August 25, 2016
6
Cancer Genetics , Cancer research , Care for adults , Gastrointestinal Cancer , Pancreatic cancer
Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Inherited?

Most cases of pancreatic cancer develop for unknown reasons, but about 10 percent occur in families that have a strong history of the disease. That doesn’t mean that if you are a member of such a family you will develop pancreatic cancer, but rather that you are at a higher […]

August 17, 2016
1
General interest
Cancer Center Staff Send Gifts to Colleagues’ Marine Son in Kuwait

During their two decades as Dana-Farber nurses, Jeannine Sudol, RN, and Mary Delaney, RN, have watched each other’s children grow up through stories, photos, and the occasional visit. So when Delaney heard this spring that Sudol’s son, Dean, was being deployed to Kuwait with the Marines, she acted right away. […]

August 5, 2016
0
Cancer Genetics , Care for adults
How to Talk to Your Family about Genetic Cancer Risk

Certain genetic conditions, such as Lynch syndrome, significantly increase your risk of developing some forms of cancer. Learning you have one of these conditions can be emotionally challenging, and deciding when and how to tell your relatives can add an additional layer of worry. Katherine Schneider, MPH, LGC, a senior […]

June 29, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults , Patient Stories, Adult
Individualized Clinical Trial Gives Patient with Rare Cancer Time to Celebrate

Kerri Antonuccio marked her 40th birthday this spring with a fresh lease on life. For the first time since 2012, she didn’t feel too sick from cancer treatment to enjoy her big day. She was also able to travel to Mexico and serve as matron of honor at her sister’s […]

June 20, 2016
2
Care for adults , Research , Risk and Prevention
What Are the Most Common Cancers in Men?

Information about cancer risk can help you make informed decisions about screening and prevention strategies. As we recognize National Men’s Health Week, learn about the most common cancers in men in the United States and the options for prevention and treatment. 1. Prostate cancer There will be an estimated 180,890 new […]

June 13, 2016
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Osteosarcoma , Patient Stories, Adult
Chemo or no Chemo, Every Cancer Patient Deserves Support

By Lyndsay McCaffery When you find out you have cancer, your mind goes to a million different places. You have an endless amount of questions, an overwhelming sense of panic, and life as you know it is changed forever. I was diagnosed with parosteal osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, […]

June 3, 2016
0
Melanoma , Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast – Episode #10: Melanoma — What’s the Latest?

Although less common than other types of skin cancer, melanoma is a dangerous disease that can spread rapidly if it is not caught early. In addition to regular self exams, it is crucial to protect yourself from the damaging effects of the sun — regardless of your age, skin color, […]

May 27, 2016
0
Health and Wellness , Health Topics , Risk and Prevention
Do Manicures Increase Cancer Risk?

The nail gels and polishes used in manicures aren’t cancer-causing. But there is concern that some some devices that use ultraviolet light to help polishes and gels dry faster could pose a small risk for skin cancer. The primary kind of ultraviolet radiation emitted by some nail dryers – UVA […]

May 26, 2016
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
A Behind the Scenes Look at the People Helping to Usher in New Cancer Therapies: A Nurse’s Story

This post originally appeared on HuffPost Impact. By Joan Lucca, RN, MSN Nearly four decades ago, I became a nurse and dedicated my life’s work to the care and comfort of patients. The ‘70s was a decade of change and opportunity as doors began to open for women in emerging […]

May 17, 2016
0
General interest , Health Topics , Research
What Are the Most Common Cancers in Women?

While there is no sure method for avoiding cancer, understanding risk factors can help you make decisions about prevention and screening for early signs of disease. As we recognize National Women’s Health Week, here’s a look at the five most common cancers in women* and steps you can take to […]

May 9, 2016
0
Cancer research , Immunotherapy
How Scientists Aim to Expand Immunotherapy Options for Cancer Patients

This post also appeared on the NERD (Novartis Explores Research & Development) blog. By Eric Bender Fighting cancer with immunotherapy has revolutionized treatment for some patients. Emphasize “some.” For most patients, drugs targeting the immune system to attack their tumors aren’t an option. This could change in the near future. […]

April 14, 2016
0
Cancer research , Melanoma , Research
The Cell that Caused Melanoma: Cancer’s Surprise Origins, Caught in Action

This post originally appeared on Vector, Boston Children’s Hospital’s science and clinical innovation blog. It’s long been a mystery why some of our cells can have mutations associated with cancer, yet are not truly cancerous. Now researchers have, for the first time, watched a cancer spread from a single cell […]

February 17, 2016
2
Cancer research , Care for adults , Chronic lymphocytic - CLL , Treatments and Procedures
A New Cancer Drug — in the Nick of Time

When Roy Jann was diagnosed with cancer in 2013, it never crossed his mind that he would be a model for the life-saving potential of venetoclax, a new type of cancer drug that had recently entered human testing. The first inkling that something was amiss had come a few weeks […]

January 15, 2016
0
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Treatments and Procedures
Tips for Communicating with Your Cancer Care Team

One of the most important parts of cancer treatment involves talking with your cancer care team. During your care it’s vital that you are able to openly discuss different aspects of your health, treatment, and symptoms you might be experiencing. To make the most of conversations with your care team, […]

December 30, 2015
0
Care for adults , Risk and Prevention
If My Lymph Nodes Are Swollen, Do I Have Cancer?

Do swollen lymph nodes mean cancer? Swollen lymph nodes are usually a sign of infection by bacteria or viruses. In a small percentage of cases, though, the swelling can be caused by cancer. Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped tissues that act as filters for lymph. Lymph is a clear fluid […]

December 28, 2015
1
Cancer research , Care for adults , Prostate cancer
The Latest in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in the United States, after skin cancer. Yet, “most men die with prostate cancer, not of prostate cancer,” says Mark Pomerantz, MD, a medical oncologist in Dana-Farber’s Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, who recently shared the latest in prostate cancer research […]

December 23, 2015
2
Care for adults , Diet and Nutrition
What Should I Eat During Cancer Treatment?

When going through cancer treatment, deciding what to eat can be confusing. For patients with cancer and particularly those undergoing chemotherapy, eating healthy can be key to managing energy levels, immune function, and overall health. It is important to eat a well balanced diet and follow the healthy eating plate […]

December 9, 2015
0
Care for adults , General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
A Special Curriculum: Teachers Tell Their Students About Cancer

Gina Johnson and Connie Grayson have a combined 53 years teaching in the public school system. Last year, however, their cancer diagnoses prompted them to incorporate a new element into their lesson plans. “When I was diagnosed with lymphoma in September 2014, one of my student’s moms had just passed […]

August 28, 2015
1
Care for adults , Coping with Cancer , Patient Stories, Adult
Five Tips for Facing a Rare Cancer

By Becky Sail At age 22, I was diagnosed with a rare sarcoma called aggressive angiomyxoma – say that 10 times fast. When my parents and I got the news we asked the doctor, “Is it cancer?” He responded, “That is a complicated question.” He said he had never seen […]

August 24, 2015
12
Care for adults , Penile cancer
Five Things You Need to Know About Penile Cancer

Penile cancer is a rare disease, affecting just 1 in 100,000 men in North American and Europe, in which malignant cells form in the tissues of the penis. While not common in the United States, it can account for up to 10 percent of male cancers in parts of Asia, South […]

July 3, 2015
3
Care for children , Childhood , Risk and Prevention
Do Childhood Cancer Survivors Have a Higher Risk of Developing Cancer Later in Life?

During cancer treatment, patients are often focused on just one thing: getting healthy. But for survivors, particularly of childhood cancer, it’s also important to learn about staying healthy after treatment, including prevention of new cancers that may occur later in life. We spoke with Lynda Vrooman, MD, associate medical director […]

June 24, 2015
0
Care for adults , General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
Young Adult Shares Tips for Coping with Cancer

By Carolyn Ridge On June 1, 2012, at the age of 30, I was diagnosed with stage IV ovarian cancer. The physical toll cancer took on my body was difficult, forcing me into early menopause, but I was even less prepared for the emotional side effects cancer would bring, including […]

June 8, 2015
1
Cancer Genetics , Care for adults , Ovarian cancer
Angelina Jolie Puts Spotlight on Genetic Testing and Ovarian Cancer Risk

Once again Angelina Jolie is making headlines after penning another op-ed in The New York Times. The actress shared she has undergone more cancer preventive surgery – this time prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy, a procedure to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. Two years ago, she wrote about her decision to […]

March 24, 2015
0
Care for adults , Care for children , Coping with Cancer , Health and Wellness
Helping Cancer Survivors Get a Good Night’s Sleep

Sarah Boczanowski was tired. Her turbulent relationship with sleep, dating back to her childhood, had only worsened since her leukemia diagnosis at age 18. Through biopsies and chemotherapy, she found sleep elusive. “With nurses and doctors coming in and out, and beeping noises from my IVs, it was impossible to […]

March 4, 2015
1
Care for children , Childhood , Patient Stories, Pediatric
Can Babies Be Born with Cancer?

For any parent, having a child with cancer is devastating. This was the case for the parents of Carrick Stafford Wood, who was born with cancer — specifically, acute myeloid leukemia (or AML). He spent the first six months of his life in the hospital before finally going home on Christmas […]

February 6, 2015
7
Cancer research , Care for adults , Immunotherapy , Ovarian cancer
Immunotherapy, Ovarian Cancer Treatment Top List of 2014 Cancer Developments

Immunotherapy, treatments for ovarian cancer, and investigating game-changing drug therapies topped the list of the most important cancer research and clinical developments at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in 2014. Here are some highlights from the last year in research: Hodgkin lymphoma Some of the most dramatic evidence of potential of immunotherapies […]

December 31, 2014
0
General interest
Real Superheroes: A Teen Talks about What Happens When Both Parents Have Cancer

By E.R. Seventeen-year-old E.R. reflects on both parents’ battles with cancer. For this post, E.R. and the family wished to remain anonymous.  Simply put, the role of a parent is to take on more roles. From lab coat supermodel and expert peanut-butter-and-jelly chef to personal shopper and bodyguard; parents do […]

September 17, 2014
3
Care for adults , Gynecologic Cancer
What are the Main Types of Gynecologic Cancers?

Close to 100,000 women are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer in the United States each year. In recognition of Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, we’re taking a look at the main types of gynecologic cancers and their symptoms. Cervical cancer In cervical cancer, cancer cells form in the tissues of the […]

September 15, 2014
2
Health Topics , Melanoma
Can Melanoma Affect Any Skin Type?

Melanoma, the deadliest skin cancer, gets its name from the pigment-producing cells called melanocytes from which tumors can develop. These cells manufacture the dark pigment, melanin. When a human develops these cells, they populate not only the skin, but also other organs including the back of the eye and the […]

August 18, 2014
0
General interest , Patient Stories, Adult
How One Teacher Shared a Cancer Diagnosis with Her Students

By Abby Morgan May 2013 was an exciting time for my husband and me.  We were in the process of buying our first house and thinking about starting a family. But, when a visit to the doctor to investigate pain in my right knee revealed a large mass, our excitement […]

June 11, 2014
2
Care for adults , Risk and Prevention
Five Things You Need to Know About Men’s Health/Cancer Screenings

Cancer affects thousands of men across the United States every year, with the most common diagnoses coming in the form of prostate, colon, testicular, lung, and skin cancer. Not all cancers can be detected early on, but for some forms of the disease, the spread of cancer can be prevented […]

June 9, 2014
2
Care for adults , Chemotherapy
‘Chemobrain’ Added to Cancer Survivorship Guidelines

Cognitive dysfunction is a common and frustrating side effect for many patients who undergo chemotherapy. The condition – also called “chemobrain” – can create problems with memory, attention and concentration, information processing, and mental skills used for organizing and scheduling. For many years, medical professionals were skeptical that these cognitive issues were […]

May 2, 2014
1
Care for adults , Care for children , Treatments and Procedures
How a Port Can Make Cancer Treatments Easier

For more than five years, Sally Boyd had repeated needle punctures in her arm for blood draws, chemotherapy, and other procedures for multiple myeloma. “The nurses said I had good veins, so at first it was easy for them to insert the needle,” Boyd recalls. “But as time went on, […]

April 14, 2014
1
Cancer research , Prostate cancer
Progress and Promise in Prostate Cancer Research

In prostate cancer – the most common cancer in men aside from skin cancer – scientists are working to answer some of the most basic questions about the disease while developing an array of new treatments. Using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, doctors are often able to detect prostate […]

February 17, 2014
1
Breast cancer , Care for adults , Integrative Therapies
Can Acupuncture Benefit Breast Cancer Patients?

By Robert Foley Increasing evidence through research at Dana-Farber and elsewhere supports the use of acupuncture as a remedy for some of the symptoms breast cancer patients experience. This integrative therapy can be used in conjunction with radiation and chemotherapy.

October 30, 2013
2
Health Topics , Uncategorized
How to Enjoy Summer without Raising Your Cancer Risk

by Joanna Steere As summer takes hold, it’s often hard to resist the delicious aroma of a backyard barbecue or soaking in some rays at the beach. However, it’s important to know the health risks associated with these common activities, especially when cancer’s involved.

May 22, 2013
2
Cancer research , Care for adults , Integrative Therapies
Can Acupuncture Ease Cancer Symptoms?

by Richard Saltus One of the oldest healing practices in the world, acupuncture is beginning to have a role in alleviating pain and discomfort associated with cancer and its treatments. Acupuncturists use fine needles to penetrate the skin and stimulate – manually or electrically – specific points on the body. Stimulation […]

April 29, 2013
2
Cancer research
Cancer Researcher Values Teaching and Learning

By William Hahn, MD, PhD Every year, hundreds of postdoctoral fellows and graduate students study cancer research at Dana-Farber under some of the world’s leading scientists. The Dana-Farber Postdoc and Graduate Student Affairs Office recently named the first recipient of its Mentor-of-the-Year Award: William Hahn, MD, PhD, the Institute’s deputy […]

February 28, 2013
0
Care for adults
The Power of Listening to Cancer Patients

By Melissa Cochran, MS, NP For my cancer patients, a stem cell transplant is a life-changing event. They cannot work outside the home for a full year; visits to Dana-Farber are about the only excursions allowed. No more trips to the grocery store or dinners at a favorite restaurant. In our clinic, […]

February 7, 2013
7
Care for adults , Male breast cancer
Can Men Get Breast Cancer?

 Pink may be the color for breast cancer advocacy, but that doesn’t mean men can’t be diagnosed with the disease. Each year, 2,000 men in the U.S. receive a breast cancer diagnosis. Current treatments are highly effective in men whose cancer is treated early. However, because men aren’t familiar with breast […]

February 5, 2013
0
Care for adults , Uncategorized
Five Questions to Ask A Cancer Patient-Talking With Someone Who Has Cancer

by Michael Buller Whenever I’ve met people with cancer, I’ve been at a loss for what to say and which questions to ask. Now, as a cancer patient, I realize the irony.

January 31, 2013
23
Cancer research , Uncategorized
Why Do Scientists Use Zebrafish to Study Cancer?

Cancer scientists use a wide variety of techniques to study the growth and development of tumor cells. Laboratory research often focuses on individual cells or tissue samples, but to learn how cancers grow and respond to therapies in living organisms, scientists rely on other experimental models. In recent years, zebrafish […]

October 18, 2012
1
Patient Stories, Pediatric , Uncategorized
The Faces of Pediatric Cancer – Sarah Levin

Faces of Childhood Cancer: Sarah Levin Sarah Levin is 11 years old, and has beaten acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) twice. This is her story. The first time I got diagnosed with ALL I was only three, so I don’t remember that much about it. But what my mom and dad […]

September 19, 2012
1
Patient Stories, Pediatric , Uncategorized
The Faces of Pediatric Cancer – Fernando Morales

Fernando Morales is a student athlete. Last year he was sidelined from the life he knew after he was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma. Now done with treatment Fernando is back with his teammates, sporting a positive outlook and a new appreciation for life. This is his story.  As a soccer […]

September 12, 2012
0
Care for adults , Health and Wellness
Reclaiming sexuality after cancer

If you’re diagnosed with cancer, you’ll probably get used to people asking about your health. And whether you’re fielding the concerns of well-meaning friends and family or the professional interests of your care team, you’ll gradually learn what responses to give. But many cancer patients and survivors choose to keep […]

July 26, 2012
0

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RT @ASH_hematology: ASH thanks 2017 President Kenneth Anderson, MD, of @DanaFarber for his leadership and service to the Society #ASH17 htt…
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Congratulations to Dana-Farber/@BrighamWomens’ Dr. Benjamin Ebert, recipient of the William Dameshek Prize, awarded… https://t.co/cG7FjvRBHC

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