‘Organoids’ Could Aid Cancer Drug Selection

Tests on living “organoids” created from patients’ ovarian cancer cells proved more accurate than DNA sequencing in predicting tumors’ sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy drugs – and combining the two methods worked even better, say scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The investigators report in Cancer Discovery that ovarian cancer organoids – tiny, three-dimensional spheres of cells … Continued

Study Resolves Decades-Long Mystery About the Most Commonly Mutated Gene in Cancer

The most commonly mutated gene in cancer has tantalized scientists for decades with the message of its mutations. Although mutations can occur at more than 1,100 sites within the TP53 gene, they arise with greatest frequency at a handful of points dubbed “hot spots.” Does this imbalance suggest that hotspot mutations are especially conducive to … Continued

5 Recent Advancements in Pediatric Cancer Treatment

From new immunotherapy treatments to improved understanding of the genetic mechanisms of pediatric tumors, the past year has brought many important advances against childhood cancers. We sat down with Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD, chair of Pediatric Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, to discuss some of these developments. CAR T-Cell Therapy for Relapsed ALL A CAR … Continued

Discovery May Improve Immunotherapy for Melanoma

Scientists at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC) have identified biomarkers in melanoma that could help tailor immunotherapy treatments to maximize the benefits for patients while reducing the likelihood of severe side effects.

The Latest Advancements in Immunotherapy for Adult Leukemia

As scientists have learned more about the intricate workings of the immune system, they’ve developed new forms of immunotherapy that have been approved for the treatment of leukemia or are being clinically tested in patients.

Researchers Identify Key Molecular Event Leading to Synovial Sarcoma

Cancer biologists led by Cigall Kadoch, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have identified a key molecular event that leads to synovial sarcoma, a rare, aggressive cancer in adolescents and young adults for which scientists are seeking better treatments.

Novel Compounds Show Promise in Protecting Against HIV-1

Scientists at Dana-Farber and other institutions have shown that compounds that mimic key proteins on white blood cells can inactivate HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, and potentially protect against exposure to the virus.

Stage IV Lung Cancer Patient in Remission for Years After Immunotherapy

Nancy Hale was given a 30 percent chance of surviving three years when she was diagnosed with lung cancer. But today, six years after her initial diagnosis and because of an immunotherapy clinical trial, Hale is in remission—and “blazing the trail” for other patients.

When is Immunotherapy the Right Treatment for Lung Cancer?

“It has been the holy grail of oncology to develop potentially curative treatments for advanced common solid tumors, and it may now be on our doorstep for at least some patients,” says Bruce Johnson, MD, a thoracic oncologist and chief clinical research officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

CAR T-Cell Clinical Trial Has Multiple Myeloma Patient Back On Her Feet

A year ago, Kelly Lamphere’s multiple myeloma was not responding to treatment, and her legs were so weakened by the cancer in her bones that she relied on a wheelchair and a walker. Today, because of CAR T-cell therapy, Lamphere’s disease is under control—and she can walk unaided again.

What’s Next in CAR T-Cell Therapy?

CAR T-cell therapy—a form of immunotherapy that uses genetically engineered T cells to intensify the immune system’s response to cancer—represents one of the biggest advances against cancer in recent years.