Cancer research
Taking Action: Why One Cancer Patient Walks

by John O’Hara One day, I was sitting in a Dana-Farber waiting room, and I looked around at all of the people waiting with me. They were someone’s mother, father, sister, brother, child, neighbor, or friend — people just like me. And they were all facing what I was facing, […]

September 23, 2016
0
Care for children
Teaghan Swims through Leukemia Treatment

  Holding hands, 3-year-old Teaghan Bresnahan and her mom run the length of the lake-front dock. At the dock’s end, Teaghan lets go – and gleefully leaps into the air to land in the water with a satisfying splash. It may seem a typical summer scene. But for Teaghan, who […]

September 22, 2016
0
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #5: Stupid Things People Say

Stupid things. We all say them. And cancer patients have heard them all — from the insensitive to the absurd, from nutrition tips to fertility advice, and just about everything in between. While patients can laugh (hopefully) at the remarks in hindsight, when they’re first said, they can cut deep, making […]

September 20, 2016
0
Care for children
Carter Climbs to New Heights – with a Prosthetic Leg

  More than 50 feet above ground, a wire rope extends from one tree to another. High in the trees, seven-year-old Carter Mock fearlessly steps off a platform and places first one foot, then the other, onto the wire. Holding tight to hanging ropes for balance, he navigates across the […]

September 15, 2016
0
Care for adults
Can Marijuana Benefit Cancer Patients?

Marijuana occupies a complicated position among the substances used to alleviate symptoms associated with cancer and cancer treatment. On the one hand, nearly half of U.S. states, mostly in the far west, northeast, and upper midwest, have legalized Cannabis (the plant from which marijuana is derived) for medical purposes. Others […]

September 14, 2016
0
Care for children
Dylan Discovers a New Sport During Cancer Treatment

Balloons of various colors are taped in a row across the wall. Twenty yards away, 8-year-old Dylan Berio announces “yellow,” pulls back the string of his bow, then releases – smiling as he hears the “pop.” His arrow successfully pierced the yellow balloon. Archery requires focus and precision – something […]

September 8, 2016
0
Care for adults
Treatments for Ovarian Cancer: Finding Your Path [Infographic]

Ovarian cancer is a complex disease. Cell types, stages, and genetics play an important role for patients and their doctors as they decide which direction to take. Fortunately, patients today have many treatment options and new advances on the horizon. Physician-scientists at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers […]

September 5, 2016
0
Care for children
Cancer or No Cancer – Carlie Will Sing

Her voice at first sings softly, then gradually gains intensity and rises to a crescendo as she belts out the refrain of a tune she and her dad co-wrote: “You’re not standing alone!” 15-year-old Carlie Gonzalez has been singing and making music for as long as she can remember. But […]

September 1, 2016
0
Cancer research
What is the Latest Research in Endometrial Cancer?

For endometrial cancer, as for virtually every form of cancer, advances in genomics are transforming the understanding and treatment of this disease, which arises in the lining of the uterus or womb. As part of the Profile research project at Dana-Farber, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Boston Children’s Hospital, investigators […]

August 30, 2016
0
Care for children
What Is Neuroblastoma?

Neuroblastoma is a cancerous tumor found in young children and infants, most commonly in children under age 5 and rarely in those older than 10. Approximately 650 children in the United States are diagnosed with neuroblastoma each year. What causes neuroblastoma? The cause of neuroblastoma is not certain, but researchers […]

August 24, 2016
1
Care for adults
What is a Benign Blood Disorder?

It might sound counterintuitive, but not every patient comes to Dana-Farber for cancer treatment. For example, the Institute’s experts regularly see patients seeking help with benign (non-cancerous) blood disorders. Benign blood disorders such as anemia and sickle cell disease are often treated at cancer centers because such institutions are home […]

August 4, 2016
0
Podcasts
Voices Podcast – Episode #5: Balancing Motherhood and Breast Cancer

It was a warm day in November 2013 when Gabby Spear found out she had breast cancer. But even in the midst of the difficult news, her responsibilities as a mom, wife, professional, and community member remained; she knew she still had to pick up her two daughters and make […]

July 26, 2016
0
Care for adults
What is an Angiogenesis Inhibitor and How Can It Be Used to Treat Cancer?

Tumors can’t grow any larger than the size of a pinhead unless the body generates a network of new blood vessels to nourish them – a process known as angiogenesis. So using drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors to block this process is an ingenious strategy with many potential advantages over standard […]

July 25, 2016
0
Cancer research
How Do PARP Inhibitors Work In Cancer?

PARPs (or Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases)  are proteins that play an important role in the life of a cell. When a strand of the DNA double helix is broken or damaged, PARPs  act as a repair crew to help fix the damaged site, allowing the cell to live. For healthy cells […]

July 21, 2016
0
Care for adults
83-Year-Old Leukemia Survivor is Riding High… in life and at PMC

Active in physical pursuits and a world traveler, Harry Beskind, MD, was surprised when he started feeling tired while on a bike ride in 2014. He had just returned home from a river trip to Portugal with his wife, and Beskind, then 82, was having trouble riding up hills on his […]

July 18, 2016
1
General interest
For the Freis, Dana-Farber Has Always Been Family

by Lauren Emily Frei When I married my husband, Emil Frei IV, in 1992, I knew I was entering into a large family. I just didn’t realize how large – until the first time I walked in the doors of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. My father-in-law, Dr. Emil “Tom” Frei III, […]

July 14, 2016
0
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #3: Coping Through Creativity

Tara Shuman didn’t necessarily set out to be a blogger, let alone a book author. Yet in the throes of a cancer diagnosis she turned to writing as an outlet. Abby Morgan also turned to blogging. A painter since an early age, and an art teacher, writing carried less pressure […]

July 12, 2016
1
Health and wellness
Why the FDA Banned Sale of E-cigarettes to Minors

Since electronic cigarettes hit the market in 2004, their sales have soared. The “vaping” culture has caught on in both adults and young people – the latter trend stirring deep concern among regulators and public health officials, and leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the sale of […]

July 6, 2016
1
Care for adults
What this Clown is Doing at a Cancer Center Will Make You Smile

Jennifer Polk anticipated a wave of emotions on her first day of breast cancer treatment, but never thought she’d have an urge to laugh – until a woman in polka-dotted pants and a whimsical headband approached her infusion chair. A smile crossed Polk’s face, and broadened as her visitor broke […]

July 5, 2016
1
Care for children
The Power of Patient and Family Centered Care: One Mom’s Journey

By Sara Dickison Taylor On June 2, 2008, my then 5 ½-year-old daughter was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). My world would never be the same. My husband and I had an eerie sense that something was very wrong. Emily’s high fevers were not resolving, even after countless days […]

July 1, 2016
0
Care for adults
How to Talk to Your Family about Genetic Cancer Risk

Certain genetic conditions, such as Lynch syndrome, significantly increase your risk of developing some forms of cancer. Learning you have one of these conditions can be emotionally challenging, and deciding when and how to tell your relatives can add an additional layer of worry. Katherine Schneider, MPH, LGC, a senior […]

June 29, 2016
0
Podcasts
Cancer Conversations Podcast – Episode #12: Advice for Parenting During Cancer Treatment

  Parents face many unique challenges when diagnosed with cancer. Perhaps one of the biggest hurdles is learning how to communicate with children about this difficult and emotional subject. “It’s important children can feel there’s open communication and they can ask questions,” says Kelly (Drummond) Giles, LICSW, a Dana-Farber social […]

June 24, 2016
0
Care for adults
How to Manage Finances During Cancer Treatment

by Rick Fingerman, CFP  Financial worries can be hard enough when you’re healthy, but dealing with finances during cancer treatment is especially difficult. During treatment, your or your family’s income may drop and your expenses will likely increase. I have overseen the Dana-Farber Pro Bono Financial Coaching Program since 2008 […]

June 21, 2016
0
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #2: Fear and ‘Scanxiety’

For otherwise healthy individuals, a CT scan or an MRI is an uncommon event. But for cancer survivors like Jeremy Pivor, it’s a routine part of life. So too is the anxiety that often accompanies each test – often referred to as “scanxiety.” Diagnosed with a brain tumor at age […]

June 7, 2016
0
Podcasts
Beyond Cancer Podcast – Episode #1: Family Dynamics

No one wants to give their kids bad news, and it’s hard to imagine worse than telling your kids you have cancer. For lymphoma survivors Gina Johnson and Connie Grayson, the challenge was greater, because they not only had their own kids to tell, but as teachers, they also had […]

May 3, 2016
0
Cancer research
A New Class of Cancer Drug Moves Closer to Potential FDA Approval in Leukemia

Updated April 13, 2015 Venetoclax, a new type of cancer drug known as a Bcl-2 inhibitor, is showing great promise against a poor-prognosis form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and could work in other cancers as well. Venetoclax, formerly known as ABT-199, attacks the protein molecule, Bcl-2, that allows cancer […]

December 6, 2015
0
Care for adults
At 91 Years Old, Sandy Cunningham Keeps On Volunteering for Cancer Patients

Ingersoll “Sandy” Cunningham has the dignified, silver-haired appearance of a man you’d expect to find sipping iced tea at the country club. So what is this Harvard-educated great-grandfather doing pushing food carts through the hallways of Dana-Farber, handing out sandwiches to patients? “You’ve got to have some objective when you […]

July 24, 2015
3
Cancer research
Immunotherapy, Targeted Drugs, Brain Cancer Research Among Highlights at Cancer Meeting

Eagerly awaited new data from trials of immunotherapy drugs, vaccines to treat brain tumors, and improved treatments for blood cancers sparked waves of optimism at the year’s biggest cancer meeting. The 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) drew about 30,000 cancer specialists to Chicago May […]

June 5, 2015
0
Care for adults , General interest
Tom Brokaw: What It Means to Have Cancer

Tom Brokaw (left) meets with Dana-Farber President and CEO Edward J. Benz, Jr., MD. The world is divided between those who are sympathetic to their friends and family who have cancer and those who have cancer and are empathetic with each other, says Tom Brokaw, the former “NBC Nightly News” […]

November 25, 2014
13
Care for children , General interest
How a Navy SEAL Veteran Helps Kids with Cancer

Adam LaReau has seen courage. The 34-year-old Navy SEAL combat veteran spent 11 years serving his country, and has seen courage in the actions of his fellow SEALS and through the children of fallen comrades who must learn to grow up without their fathers. Now living in Boston, LaReau has […]

November 11, 2014
3
General interest
How Does Chemotherapy Work? Including Oral Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy

More than half of all people with cancer will get chemotherapy – powerful drugs that kill cancer cells to cure the disease, slow its growth, or reduce its symptoms. There are more than 100 different drugs used in chemotherapy, sometimes alone, but more often in combinations that have proven effective […]

November 10, 2014
5
General interest
Breast Cancer Survivor Barbara Stinson Turns to Nature and Photography

To most people, a flower is just a flower. To 70-year-old Barbara Stinson, flowers represent beauty, energy and positivity. A two-time breast cancer survivor, she has combined her passions of gardening and photography in her new book, “PINK PETALS: A Focus on Healing through a Gallery of Flowers.” Each of […]

October 6, 2014
0
General interest
What are Merkel Cells?

Merkel cells are found just below your skin’s surface, on the lowest level of your top layer of skin (the epidermis). Connected to nerve endings associated with the sensation of touch, Merkel cells play a key role in helping us identify fine details and textures by touch. A rare and […]

October 3, 2014
0
Care for adults
What is Liposarcoma?

Cancers known as sarcomas develop in the connective tissues, such as muscle, fat, and bone, that hold the body together. The type of sarcoma diagnosed in Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, liposarcoma, originates in fat cells that have been driven by random DNA errors into malignant growth, forming tumors. George Demetri, […]

September 19, 2014
0
Cancer research
Keytruda: New Immunotherapy Drug for Melanoma Wins FDA Approval

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new type of  immunotherapy drug that will provide a much-needed option for patients with advanced or inoperable melanoma who no longer respond to other drugs – including the immunotherapy agent ipilimumab (Yervoy). The drug, pembrolizumab or MK-3745, will be marketed under the name  Keytruda. Based on […]

September 5, 2014
4
Care for adults , Uncategorized
Dentist Brings a Smile to Transplant Patients

Like many family members of cancer patients, Stephen Matarazzo, DMD, wanted a meaningful way to thank the Dana-Farber caregivers who saved his son Michael’s life. What he came up with involved offering his own professional expertise to protect the smiles of others. A dentist based in Quincy, Mass., Matarazzo provides […]

1
Health and wellness
Five Things You Need to Know About Cancer Genetics

Although most cancers are sporadic or occur by chance, a small percentage are due to inherited genetic (or germline) mutations, which can often be identified through genetic testing.  These mutations are different from somatic mutations, which are not inherited, but occur during one’s lifetime. Profile, a research project launched by Dana-Farber […]

July 7, 2014
0
Care for adults
Facts About Throat Cancer

Throat cancer is one of many cancers that affect the head and neck area, including the nasopharynx, the area of the throat behind the nose; the oropharynx, middle part of the throat; the hypopharynx, the bottom section of the throat; the oral cavity where the tongue sits; and the larynx, […]

July 3, 2014
2
Care for adults
Is Chemo Working If I Don’t Lose My Hair?

It’s well known that many chemotherapy medications used to treat cancer can bring undesirable side effects, such as hair loss, lack of appetite, and fatigue. But experiencing such symptoms is not an indication of whether cancer treatment is working. Chemotherapy interferes with a cell’s ability to grow and divide, so […]

May 16, 2014
0
Cancer research
How Cancer Researchers Are Working to Help Fight MERS Virus

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), a viral respiratory illness has been in the news a lot lately.  MERS, first detected in Saudia Arabia in 2012, is caused by a coronavirus called “Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus” (MERS-CoV). It isn’t known exactly where the virus comes from though many infectious disease […]

May 15, 2014
0
Care for adults
Esophageal Cancer: Five Things You Need to Know

Although it is not a common disease, esophageal cancer affects about 18,000 new patients each year in the United States. Typically, the disease is found more often in men than in women, with men having about a ten-fold higher risk of developing esophageal cancer. “Esophageal and gastric cancers are some […]

April 7, 2014
32
General interest
Play Ball: The Red Sox and Jimmy Fund Start Another Season Together

Their season starts today, and although the Boston Red Sox will have a lot of competition in their quest to repeat as World Series champions, fans can be certain of one thing: a continuation of the baseball team’s special bond with the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dating from […]

March 31, 2014
1
Cancer research
A History of Multiple Myeloma Advances

Not long ago, a diagnosis of multiple myeloma — a cancer of the bone marrow — carried with it a very poor prognosis, with median survival estimates of just two to three years. Now, thanks in large part to research and treatment advances at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC), […]

February 24, 2014
8
Uncategorized
Patient’s Grandson: How My Grandfather Inspires Me

Many young boys have special relationships with their grandfathers. Few express their feelings as eloquently as young Oliver Parry. Inspired by his grandfather’s work and his battle with cancer, the nine-year-old penned the essay below, winning a regional award from the 2013-2014 Parent Teacher Association (PTA) Reflections contest, and potentially […]

February 10, 2014
1
Cancer research
Cancer Immunology at Dana-Farber

Immunotherapy – stimulating the body’s defenses to recognize and destroy disease-causing cells and proteins – was dubbed the “breakthrough of the year” in 2013 by Science magazine. Dana-Farber researchers have contributed many important discoveries over the years about how the immune system works. Now, they are building on these insights […]

January 30, 2014
0
General interest
When It Comes To Fighting Leukemia, This Patient Says, “Sharpen your Sword”

By Buck Rogers When I woke up from a 40-minute operation to remove a lymph node from my neck, my Ear, Nose & Throat surgeon approached me with another doctor and said, “I’d like you to meet your oncologist.” My life instantly changed; I was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. […]

December 30, 2013
4
General interest
A History of Holiday Celebrations

While the winter holidays are a festive time of year, they can also be very challenging for individuals and families undergoing cancer treatment. Dana-Farber has always tried to make the season a little brighter for its patients and staff.  

December 23, 2013
0
General interest
Photo History: The Legacy of Dr. Sidney Farber

This Thanksgiving, as we continue to look for better ways to care for our patients today, and in the future, we also look back and give thanks to the foresight of our founder, Sidney Farber, MD.

November 25, 2013
1
Cancer research
Fighting the Lung Cancer Stigma

Despite the research, the promising new drugs, the many ongoing clinical trials, lung cancer remains a disease that affects too many people, too often. For patients and family members, the disease carries an added burden: a stigma that lung cancer and smoking go hand in hand, and that lung cancer […]

November 22, 2013
7
Cancer research
Research Report: New Treatments for Melanoma

by Richard Saltus As recently as five years ago, progress in treating life-threatening malignant melanoma was slow. Since then, several molecularly targeted drugs have burst on the scene, and new strategies for awakening the immune system to attack the cancer cells have yielded dramatic long-term survival benefits for some patients. […]

November 18, 2013
5
Care for adults
Marine Conquers Leukemia with Support from Family and the Massachusetts State Police

By Tim Crowley This Veteran’s Day, Dana-Farber thanks our patients, survivors, families, and friends who have served or are serving in the armed forces, including survivors Stacey Carroll, Ben Groen, and Tim Crowley, who tells his story below. In June 2010, I was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a […]

November 11, 2013
11
General interest , Uncategorized
New Statues Celebrate Sidney Farber, MD, and “Jimmy”

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund have long been connected with baseball. So it’s only fitting that the new statues of Dana-Farber founder Sidney Farber, MD, and 12-year-old Einar Gustafson, one of his early patients, reflect this historic relationship.

October 17, 2013
0
Care for adults
How to Tell Your Children You Have Cancer

by Richard Saltus For many parents, their first concern after a cancer diagnosis is the impact it will have on their children. There’s a lot of medical information to digest and decisions to be made, including how and when to tell your children. There are good reasons talk to your […]

September 23, 2013
1
Care for adults
One Year After My Stem Cell Transplant — What I’ve Learned

by Martha Laperle When my son Ryan ran the Boston Marathon this year, I watched him with a special level of pride. Not only had he completed his first-ever marathon in four hours, but he was running, in large part, because of me. Just over a year earlier, at the […]

September 20, 2013
14
Care for adults
Is a Preventive Mastectomy the Right Choice For You?

Does having cancer in one breast increase the risk of cancer occurring in the other, healthy breast? Young women with breast cancer often respond with a “yes” and overestimate the need to have the healthy breast surgically removed, according to a recent study by Dana-Farber investigators. However, the actual risk of […]

September 18, 2013
0
Care for children
Six Important Questions About Childhood Cancer

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. We asked Lisa Diller, MD, chief medical officer at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, to answer these important questions. What signs might lead a child’s pediatrician to suspect cancer? Cancer is very diverse, and diagnosis is further complicated because many signs and symptoms—like fever, […]

September 11, 2013
0
Care for children
Making ‘Em Laugh: 12-year-old Cancer Patient Compiles Joke Book

Jack Robinson is a special kid. Diagnosed with bone cancer at the age of 11, he tackled treatment if not with a smile on his face, then with a joke on his lips… or more accurately, on paper. The Massachusetts resident compiled and edited a joke book called, “Make ‘em […]

September 4, 2013
6
Care for adults
Dating and Cancer 101

by Amy Atwood SWF, Bald, Undergoing Chemo and Radiation… Oh yeah, isn’t that the first profile you would click on if you were searching for the love of your life or even just a new ‘friend’ online? Dating in itself – or, I should say, finding someone to date – […]

August 21, 2013
17
Cancer research
Reasons for Optimism in Lung Cancer

Lung cancer can be a frightening diagnosis. However, new treatment approaches and promising research trends have made the outlook for patients a little more optimistic, says David Jackman, MD, an oncologist in the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

August 19, 2013
10
Care for adults
What Should You Do if You’re Diagnosed with DCIS?

A group of specialists at the National Cancer Institute recently issued a report calling for a redefinition of the word “cancer,” suggesting that it no longer be applied to certain premalignant and non-lethal conditions. Such a change, the panel wrote, may ease the fears of patients, making them less inclined to […]

August 9, 2013
27
Care for adults
Confronting the Mental Challenges of Cancer Treatment

by Richard Saltus Living with cancer is a physical and emotional challenge, but people may also find it hampers their thought processes and memory. Often the deficits are temporary, but sometimes they persist or appear months or years later as delayed effects. Cognitive difficulties, says Clare Humphreys, PhD, a neuropsychologist at […]

August 8, 2013
3
Care for adults
Tips for Talking to Your Children About Genetic Test Results

There are many decisions parents face after testing for genetic cancer risk, including whether to tell their children and how to approach the conversation. If you decide to talk to your children about the test results, allow yourself some time to process the information; you want to be calm and […]

August 6, 2013
0
Care for adults
Making Fertility Decisions Post-Diagnosis

Liz Moroney celebrated her 23rd birthday in an unusual place — at a fertility clinic. Liz, a recent college graduate, wanted to plan for having children before it was too late. Diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in June 2010, she spent 4 months in chemotherapy treatment in New York. Afterward, she […]

July 1, 2013
2
Cancer research
Avastin Helps Patients with Glioblastomas, Doctors Say

The drug Avastin, when added to initial therapy for glioblastoma, can give patients a few extra months’ reprieve before their brain tumors start growing again, but does it make their quality of life better – or worse? That’s a matter of heated debate for doctors – and confusion for patients […]

June 28, 2013
6
Care for adults , Uncategorized
Why It’s Important to See a Specialist

By Leonard Ansin In January 2012, my wife and I had left Boston to spend a few months in sunny Florida. We had just passed Orlando when my cell phone rang. It was my primary care physician calling to tell me she was concerned that my PSA  was elevated to […]

June 20, 2013
21
General interest
What’s the Difference Between Cancer Grade and Cancer Stage?

When solid tumors are diagnosed, they are often assigned a grade and a stage. The grade of a tumor is an indication of how quickly it is likely to grow and spread. In general, low-grade tumors grow slowly and higher-grade tumors grow more rapidly. Tumors are assigned a grade based […]

June 12, 2013
0
Care for children
Should Boys and Girls Be Vaccinated Against HPV?

By Robert Haddad, MD Human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccinations were originally advised only for girls. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College of Pediatrics now recommend that both girls and boys be vaccinated. The recommendations are well founded: HPV infection is the number one cause of […]

June 6, 2013
15
Uncategorized
Facing First-Time Parenthood… and Cancer

By Lyndsay McCaffery The first year of your baby’s life is special. They come home to you this eating, pooping, screaming machine and twelve months later they are their own walking and babbling little person. It is a year to truly cherish because you realize what parents mean when they […]

May 31, 2013
7
General interest
Meet Boston Marathon Runner and Platelet Donor Wendy Akeson

By Saul Wisnia Wendy Akeson is passionate about both running and donating platelets. Never has she felt such a strong connection between these two roles as she did this year. Four minutes after completing her 10th consecutive Boston Marathon, Akeson heard the explosions that will forever link this year’s marathon […]

May 27, 2013
0
Health and wellness , Uncategorized
How to Enjoy Summer without Raising Your Cancer Risk

by Joanna Steere As summer takes hold, it’s often hard to resist the delicious aroma of a backyard barbecue or soaking in some rays at the beach. However, it’s important to know the health risks associated with these common activities, especially when cancer’s involved.

May 22, 2013
2
Health and wellness
What Are Common Brain Tumor Symptoms?

by Richard Saltus People experiencing an unusual or particularly bad headache sometimes worry they might have a brain tumor. Headaches are very common and usually don’t signal a serious illness – but when should you be checked out by a doctor? We asked neuro-oncologists Lakshmi Nayak, MD, and Eudocia Quant […]

May 15, 2013
0
Cancer research , Care for children
Genetic Testing, Cancer Risk, and Angelina Jolie’s Choice

Actress Angelina Jolie is no stranger to the headlines, but she stunned the world with her Op-Ed in The New York Times, in which she shared her very private decision to have a preventive double mastectomy after testing positive for the BRCA1 gene mutation. “I hope that other women can benefit […]

May 14, 2013
5
Care for adults
Expecting a Baby—Not Cancer

Editor’s Note: This is the second in our series of stories celebrating Moms this Mother’s Day weekend. Yesterday, Michelle Maloney shared her story. Today, it’s Allison Bellevue’s turn. By Christine Triantos In one whirlwind year, Allison Bellevue moved to Boston, started a new job, met her future husband, and discovered […]

May 12, 2013
0
Care for adults
Mom, cancer survivor has ‘a lot to celebrate’ this Mother’s Day

Editor’s Note: This weekend we celebrate Mother’s Day with two inspiring stories of Moms whose cancer diagnoses came while they were pregnant. Today, Michelle Maloney shares her story. By Naomi Funkhouser On a cold October evening, Michelle Maloney braced herself against the night chill. As she hugged herself in bed, […]

May 11, 2013
2
Care for adults , Health and wellness
Who should have PSA testing for prostate cancer?

Millions of men each year have their blood tested for prostate specific antigen, or PSA, a normal protein whose levels may be elevated in men with prostate cancer or other benign diseases of the prostate. However, experts have disagreed on who should be tested, when and how frequently. Some are […]

May 9, 2013
0
Health and wellness , Uncategorized
How to Find Good Cancer Information Online

by Eric Schuller For many cancer patients, the Internet serves as a vital tool used to stay in touch with loved ones during treatment, find comfort and advice from other patients and caregivers, or even research clinical trials. But using the Web to learn more about a cancer diagnosis or […]

May 7, 2013
0
Health and wellness
Are Tanning Beds Safe?

Updated 1/28/16 If you’re thinking about hitting the tanning beds to get started on your “base tan,” don’t. That’s the advice of Jennifer Y Lin, MD, of Dana-Farber’s Center for Melanoma Oncology. Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is on the rise, particularly in women aged 25-32. The frequency […]

May 3, 2013
3
Cancer research , Care for children
Five Reasons for Optimism about Pediatric Cancer Care and Research

By Stephen Sallan, MD Today, three quarters or more of all childhood cancer patients will be cured of their disease, a higher percentage than ever before. And the numbers will only get better as we learn more about the biology of childhood cancers and develop new ways of treating them.

May 2, 2013
0
Cancer research , Care for adults
Can Acupuncture Ease Cancer Symptoms?

by Richard Saltus One of the oldest healing practices in the world, acupuncture is beginning to have a role in alleviating pain and discomfort associated with cancer and its treatments. Acupuncturists use fine needles to penetrate the skin and stimulate – manually or electrically – specific points on the body. Stimulation […]

April 29, 2013
2
Cancer research
Turning Traditional Medicine Into Cancer Drugs

Quite a few substances used in traditional medicine in China or other countries have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as cancer drugs… and their numbers are growing.  Some examples are: Arsenic trioxide, made from arsenic sulfide ore, has been used therapeutically for more than 2,400 years. Following promising […]

April 23, 2013
1

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